Lecture 15-1-3 - inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance r between them It is proportional to the product of the magnitudes

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    Polarization In most neutral atoms or molecules, the  center of positive charge coincides with the  center of negative charge In the presence of a charged object, these  centers may separate slightly This results in more positive charge on one side of  the molecule than on the other side This realignment of charge on the surface of  an insulator is known as  polarization
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    Examples of  Polarization The charged object (on  the left) induces charge  on the surface of the  insulator A charged comb  attracts bits of paper  due to polarization of  the paper
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    Coulomb’s Law Coulomb shows that an electrical force has  the following properties: It is along the line joining the two particles and 
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Unformatted text preview: inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance, r, between them It is proportional to the product of the magnitudes of the charges, |q 1 |and |q 2 |on the two particles It is attractive if the charges are of opposite signs and repulsive if the charges have the same signs Coulomb’s Law, cont. Mathematically, k e is called the Coulomb Constant k e = 8.9875 x 10 9 N m 2 /C 2 Typical charges can be in the µC range Remember, Coulombs must be used in the equation Remember that force is a vector quantity Applies only to point charges 2 2 1 e r q q k F = Characteristics of Particles...
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This note was uploaded on 09/06/2009 for the course PHYSICS Physics 2A taught by Professor Sydney.sukuta during the Fall '09 term at San Jose City College.

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Lecture 15-1-3 - inversely proportional to the square of the separation distance r between them It is proportional to the product of the magnitudes

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