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Wildlife 449, Intro 1 8.27.09

Wildlife 449, Intro 1 8.27.09 - Diseases of Wildlife 449...

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Diseases of Wildlife 449 Noble Jackson DVM MS American Association of Wildlife Veterinarians Wildlife Disease Association The Wildlife Society Department of Veterinary Science and Microbiology [email protected]
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Diseases of Wildlife 449 Agents of Disease Vocabulary
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Diseases of Wildlife 449 Disease –An abnormal condition of an organism that impairs normal body functions. Or n. a pathological condition of a part, organ or system of an organism. A disease is usually associated with symptoms and signs. Emerging Disease –A disease that has not been previously observed or one that has existed at a low or insignificant level but is now increasing in importance
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Diseases of Wildlife 449 Agents of Disease Infectious** a living organism capable of invading another living organism. Invades body tissue with the resultant production of disease Non-Infectious** nonliving causes of disease
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Infectious Agents of Disease 1. Viruses 2. Bacteria 3. Rickettsia - bacteria 4. Chlamydia- bacteria 5. Fungi 6. Parasites 7. Prions - Disrupt DNA in body
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Viruses Parvovirus A microorganism smaller than bacteria which cannot grow or reproduce apart from a living cell. They may contain either DNA or RNA as their genetic material. A virus invades living cells and uses their chemical machinery to keep alive and replicate itself. Viremia- The presence of virus in the blood
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Bacteria Unicellular microorganisms that have a wide variety of shapes, (rods, round, spiral). They can be primary (anthrax) or opportunistic (Pasturella) pathogens Leptospirosis- Streptococcus
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Bacteria Mycoplasma
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Chlamydia Obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that form elementary bodies within cells Ornithosis- Psitticosis Parrot Fever
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Rickettsia Nonmotile, gram negative, non-spore forming pleomorphic bacteria. They enter, grow and replicate in host cells (usually endothelial cells)(cells lining blood vessels) Rickettsia rickettsia— (Rocky mountain spotted fever) Heartwater Disease E. Canis Potomac horse fever
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Fungi Fungal infections, mycosis, are classified according to the tissue involved and mode of entry into the body. Aspergillosis Superficial- ringworms Subcutaneous Systemic- get all over body Opportunistic
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Parasites A living organism that benefits from its association with a host. The parasites usually obtain nutrition from the host.
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