Chapter 2 7-Falling down a slope

Chapter 2 7-Falling down a slope - 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 m 2 25 m 5...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Falling Objects Question: Objects near the Earth’s surface fall when released. Can we use what we’ve just learned to understand that process? Approach: Drop an object and measure its position at later times. Physics 102 Falling Objects Slide 1 Department of Physics, The University of Arizona To slow the process down, drop the ball along a slope. Let’s perform an imaginary experiment.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
0m 1m 4m 9m 16m 25m Imaginary experiment: ball on slope Physics 102 Falling Objects Slide 2 Department of Physics, The University of Arizona The slope… the ball… click to go! Data: t (sec) 0 1 2 3 4 5 s (meters) 0 1 4 9 16 25 Conclusion: s is proportional to t 2 . ( 29 ( 29
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 m 2 25 m 5 /s s s at a s t a = = = = The proportionality constant gives the acceleration: record once per second Imaginary ball on slope (contd) Answers lead to more questions: Why does the acceleration have the value 2 m/s 2 ? Qualitatively: It depends on the slope angle Physics 102 Falling Objects Slide 1 Department of Physics, The University of Arizona It depends on the properties of the ball It depends on the Earths gravity Well learn the details later in this course. Meanwhile, lets study a special case: Pure vertical motion, or free fall . Concluding remark...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 09/07/2009 for the course V SC 315 taught by Professor - during the Spring '09 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

Page1 / 3

Chapter 2 7-Falling down a slope - 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 m 2 25 m 5...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online