385lec1 - PHYS 385 Lecture 1 - Introduction Lecture 1 -...

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PHYS 385 Lecture 1 - Introduction 1 - 1 ©2003 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further copying or resale is strictly prohibited. Lecture 1 - Introduction What's important : course outline review of old quantum theory Text : Gasiorowicz, Chap. 1 PHYS 385 assumes that the student has completed a 6-7 week introduction to quantum concepts at the second year level and is currently enrolled in a first course on differential equations. The lectures follow the recommended text for much of the course, and an attempt is made to keep the notation consistent with it. Textbook Recommended: Stephen Gasiorowicz Quantum Physics (2 nd ed.) Supplementary: Leonard Schiff, Quantum Mechanics Marking roughly 10 assignments 15% midterm exam 25% final exam 60% Outline 1. Wave packets and probability 2. Schrödinger equation and its interpretation 3. Review of one-dimensional systems 4. Schrödinger equation in three dimensions 5. Hydrogen atom 6. Spin 7. Time-independent perturbation theory 8. Poly-electron atoms 9. Molecules 10. Collision theory Introduction Second year courses on modern physics introduce the idea that the energy of a photon with frequency is quantized as E = h (1) where h = Planck's constant = 6.63 x 10 -34 J-s.
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PHYS 385 Lecture 1 - Introduction 1 - 2 ©2003 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further copying or resale is strictly prohibited. This proposal explained two physical phenomena that had challenged physicists at the end of the nineteen century: the frequency distribution of electromagnetic radiation in equilibrium at a fixed temperature the photoelectric effect. The role of quantized energy in explaining these phenomena is described in all introductory texts on quantum mechanics, and will not be discussed further here. Rather, our starting point is the "old" quantum theory of Bohr and de Broglie, that made
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385lec1 - PHYS 385 Lecture 1 - Introduction Lecture 1 -...

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