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385lec26 - PHYS 385 Lecture 26 Intrinsic spin Lecture 26...

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PHYS 385 Lecture 26 - Intrinsic spin 26 - 1 ©2003 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further copying or resale is strictly prohibited. Lecture 26 - Intrinsic spin What's important : electron spin representations of spin states spin operators Text : Gasiorowicz, Chap. ?? Electron Spin As far as our present day knowledge of the electron goes, it appears to be a point down to 10 -17 m. That is, when two electrons collide and scatter: space time the potential which governs their motion appears to be entirely coulombic: V ( r ) ~ 1 / r There is nothing to experimentally suggest that the electron’s charge is in any way “smeared” out, or not concentrated at a point. If we take a beam of electrons and send them through a magnetic field, we find that the beam breaks into two parts incident electron outgoing beam split in two beam Stern-Gerlach experiment The fact that the beam splits in a magnetic field implies that there must be some other electromagnetic quantity associated with the electron besides its electric charge; it must also have a magnetic dipole moment. Usually, we associate a magnetic dipole moment with a spinning charge distribution. That this effect is observed for nucleons with a magnetic moment would not trouble us at all - nucleons have a spatial extent of about 10 -15 m which can be determined from
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PHYS 385 Lecture 26 - Intrinsic spin 26 - 2 ©2003 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University.
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