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Extra Credit - Logistics of the Influenza Virus The...

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Logistics of the Influenza Virus The influenza virus is separated in to three groups: A, B, and C. Influenza A and B are responsible for the contagious epidemics we are most familiar with during the flu season months of November through March. Type C influenza mildly affects individuals with small respiratory infections or no symptoms at all (Davis, 2009). The flu virus is most commonly spread from person to person via minute droplets expelled by a cough or a sneeze(Davis, 2009). Flu pathology is caused by the destruction of respiratory epithelial cells, which is due to the immune response to the virus (Kosinski, 2009). The common flu virus is comprised of single stranded RNA, which is complementary to the messenger RNA that must be made from it (Kosinski, 2009). Influenza is an animal virus in the family Orthomyxoviridae. Like most animal viruses, influenza is maintains an envelope comprised of host cell membrane, with viral proteins forming spiking protrusions around the geometrical capsid (Davis, 2009). The spiked viral proteins protruding from the envelope are used to identify and latch onto molecules on the surface of host cells. The protein spikes are composed of two surface proteins hemagglutinin(H) and neuraminidase (N)(Kosinski, 2009). Viruses
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Extra Credit - Logistics of the Influenza Virus The...

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