Report5

Report5 - Name: TA: Section: Date: David Calderon Jie Zhang...

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Name: David Calderon TA: Jie Zhang Section: TH 7:35-9:25 Date: 03/20/09 PROJECTILE MOTION Abstract: Galileo observed that pendulums undergo periodic motion with a period that is independent of its mass and angular amplitude less than 15º; rather, their motion is dependent upon the length of their rod. Motion of a pendulum can be expressed in terms of Newton's law of universal gravitation. By substituting g in equation 1 with a form of Newton's law of universal gravitation (equation 2), the g of Earth can can be found and confirm Galileo's observations of pendulums: 1. T = 2 p L g 2. g = GM E / R E 2
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I OBJECTIVE Verify or invalidate that the period of pendulum motion is independent of its mass and angular amplitude by conducting various experiments with pendulums that follow periodic motion as expressed with Newton's law of universal gravitation. To show that periodic motion can be expressed with Newton's laws of universal gravitation, it is demonstrated by determining the gravitational constant of Earth using Newton's law of universal gravitation in conjunction with the equation for periodic motion. II PROCEDURE The equipment in this experiment required an apparatus consisting of an inclined plane connected to a a guided track with photogates 1 and 2 at the connecting and opposite end of the guided track, respectively. The guided track lead to a drop where a time of flight accessory (called photogate 3 for future reference)
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Report5 - Name: TA: Section: Date: David Calderon Jie Zhang...

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