CHM3610_Fall_09_ProblemSet_1

CHM3610_Fall_09_ProblemSet_1 - If not, suggest other...

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CHEM 3610 Problem Set #1 Due – Friday, September 4 th 1. Balance the following nuclear reactions Ra _______ 226 88 U + Be ______ + 5 n 1 0 238 92 8 4 (a) (b) β -decay 2. How many protons, neutrons, and electrons are present in 24 Mg, 24 Na + , 99 Mo, 99 Tc, 129 Xe, 127 I - , 195 Pt 2+ , 197 Au 3+ 3. What color light will be emitted when an electron falls back from n = 6 to n = 2 in a hydrogen atom? 4. How many electrons with quantum numbers n = 4 and l = 2 can exist in an atom? Describe them using all four quantum numbers. 5. Why are the ionization energies of the alkali metals in the order Li > Na > K > Rb? 6. The second ionization of carbon (C + Æ C 2+ + e - ) and the first ionization of boron (B Æ B + + e - ) both fit the reaction 1s 2 2s 2 2p 1 Æ 1s 2 2s 2 + e - . Compare the two ionization energies (24.383 eV and 8.298 eV, respectively) and the effective nuclear charges, Z eff . Is this an adequate explanation for the difference in ionization energies?
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Unformatted text preview: If not, suggest other factors. 7. Ionization energies should depend on the effective nuclear charge that holds the electron in the atom. Calculate Z eff using Slaters rules for O, S, and Se. Do their ionization energies match the effective nuclear charges? If not, what other factors influence the ionization energies? 8. Using Slaters rules, calculate Z eff for removal of an electron from the 4s and 3d orbital of Mn. 9. Write the electronic configurations for the following ions: Cr 2+ , Mn 2+ , Fe 3+ , W 2+ , Gd 3+ . Determine the number of unpaired electrons in each. 10. Identify the type of H atom orbital that has two planar (at origin) nodes and no radial nodes. (b) the probability function of an orbital ( l = 2) is drawn below. Identify the type of orbital.(s, p, or d, etc.) and the value for n for this orbital....
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This note was uploaded on 09/09/2009 for the course CHM 3610 taught by Professor Scott during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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