Ch 12 – Monopoly

Ch 12 – Monopoly - Ch. 12: Monopoly Olivier...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ch. 12:  Ch. 12:  Monopoly Monopoly Olivier Giovannoni ECO 304K – Introduction to Microeconomics
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Outline Outline Competition is a sin -John D. Rockefeller American Tycoon, founder of the Standard Oil, richest man who ever lived 1. Market power 2. Single-price monopoly: 1. Output and price decision 2. Comparison with perfect competition; the case of rent- seeking 3. Price discrimination Ch. 12 – Monopoly – 
Background image of page 2
1. Market power 1. Market power Definition:   A monopoly is a situation where…  1. There is only one firm 2. The monopolist produces a good or service for which there  is no close substitute  (the MR is not equal to the price and MR  is not flat) 3. There are entry/exit barriers to the market. Implication:  Because a monopoly doesn’t have  competition,  a monopoly enjoys market power.  This is  the ability to influence the market, especially the market  price, in order to influence the quantities sold and the  revenue.  That makes monopolies price makers  (≠  price  takers  in perfect competition) A monopoly can have two pricing strategies  (2 ≠  types of monopoly) depending on whether the good  produced can be resold or not: Ch. 12 – Monopoly – 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
§2: Single-price monopolies  are selling their  products at a unique price. This usually happens  when resale of the good is possible.          §3: Price-discriminating monopolies  charge  different prices for the same goods sold (airlines,  movie theaters). This is usually the case when resale  is not possible. Examples:  Monopoly situations are quite widespread.  They include a lot of utility and high-tech companies  (because when you have a technological advance you  are the only one to produce such product, i.e. the  iPhone) but also… resource control:  when a company has acquired the  majority of the resource (like DeBeers for diamonds,  or Mittal for steel, or other companies for Teak wood  or other natural resources) 1. Market power (…) 1. Market power (…) Ch. 12 – Monopoly – 
Background image of page 4
legally : there are copyrights, patents, licenses so that  some products can only be produced by certain  companies (pharmaceuticals and chemistry are good  examples, but also some professions such as doctors  or lawyers are restricted). Those are  legal  monopolies . naturally : a  natural monopoly   is a situation in which  one firm is able to supply the whole market because  of economies of scale that never end (they never  enter the stage of diseconomies of scale). This  means that the more the firm produces, the lower its  costs per unit (ex: electricity, water and utilities in  general).
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 35

Ch 12 – Monopoly - Ch. 12: Monopoly Olivier...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online