engineering #2b steel - William Matthew Speight Lab 2b Fuel...

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William Matthew Speight Lab 2b Fuel Cell Cathode and Steel 1. A ductile material would be more malleable and able to stay intact when under a lot of pressure or force instead of shattering like a brittle material might. However, brittle materials tend to be harder than a ductile material. If both materials were to be broken, the brittle material would be best since the materials are easily put back together versus the stretched out and snapped ductile material. 2. A harder material is more resistant to greater forces, resulting in dents when a lot of force is applied instead of a hole that may result in a softer material. However, softer materials tend to be more ductile than harder materials and harder materials tend to be more brittle, resulting in a possibility that a softer material being more preferable to a harder material. 3. By using a more oxidation resistant material, you are trying to inhibit corrosion and increasing the life of the fuel cell as a whole. 4. If a material has not changed weight, you may be able to come to the conclusion that here is a metal oxide layer formed on the edge of the steel from being oxidized, but the outer layer of the steel has still been
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engineering #2b steel - William Matthew Speight Lab 2b Fuel...

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