DivideAndConquer-handouts-2

DivideAndConquer-handouts-2 - Merge Sort 2/19/2006 10:03 PM...

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Unformatted text preview: Merge Sort 2/19/2006 10:03 PM 1 Divide-and-Conquer 1 Divide-and-Conquer 7 2 9 4 2 4 7 9 7 2 2 7 9 4 4 9 7 7 2 2 9 9 4 4 Divide-and-Conquer 2 Outline and Reading Divide-and-conquer paradigm (5.2) Review Merge-sort (4.1.1) Recurrence Equations (5.2.1) Iterative substitution Recursion trees Guess-and-test The master method Integer Multiplication (5.2.2) Merge Sort 2/19/2006 10:03 PM 2 Divide-and-Conquer 3 Divide-and-Conquer Divide-and conquer is a general algorithm design paradigm: Divide : divide the input data S in two or more disjoint subsets S 1 , S 2 , Recur : solve the subproblems recursively Conquer : combine the solutions for S 1 , S 2 , , into a solution for S The base case for the recursion are subproblems of constant size Analysis can be done using recurrence equations Divide-and-Conquer 4 Merge-Sort Review Merge-sort on an input sequence S with n elements consists of three steps: Divide : partition S into two sequences S 1 and S 2 of about n / 2 elements each Recur : recursively sort S 1 and S 2 Conquer : merge S 1 and S 2 into a unique sorted sequence Algorithm mergeSort ( S, C ) Input sequence S with n elements, comparator C Output sequence S sorted according to C if S.size () > 1 ( S 1 , S 2 ) partition ( S , n /2) mergeSort ( S 1 , C ) mergeSort ( S 2 , C ) S merge ( S 1 , S 2 ) Merge Sort 2/19/2006 10:03 PM 3 Divide-and-Conquer 5 Recurrence Equation Analysis The conquer step of merge-sort consists of merging two sorted sequences, each with n / 2 elements and implemented by means of a doubly linked list, takes at most bn steps, for some constant b . Likewise, the basis case ( n < 2) will take at b most steps. Therefore, if we let T ( n ) denote the running time of merge-sort: We can therefore analyze the running time of merge-sort by finding a closed form solution to the above equation. That is, a solution that has T ( n ) only on the left-hand side. + < = 2 if ) 2 / ( 2 2 if ) ( n bn n T n b n T Divide-and-Conquer 6 Iterative Substitution In the iterative substitution, or plug-and-chug, technique, we iteratively apply the recurrence equation to itself and see if we can find a pattern Note that the base case, T(n)=b, occurs when 2 i =n....
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DivideAndConquer-handouts-2 - Merge Sort 2/19/2006 10:03 PM...

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