Psychology 365 Lecture 26 (March 25) Ian

Psychology 365 Lecture 26 (March 25) Ian - Outline Visual...

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Outline Visual Knowledge (Ch. 11) Why does evoking mental imagery improve memory? Imageability/Concreteness effects DCT and why Imageable is better Imagery in the brain and images of the brain
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Imagery in Memory How does visual information influence your memory? Imagery improves memory. CAT JUSTICE
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The Imageability Ratings Task What do we mean by imageability or concreteness? P’s are presented with a list of words Using a 1-7 scale, words are rated in terms of how much imagery they invoke CARROT 5.77 POTATO 6.17 THOUGHT 3.48 IDEA 3.19
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Imagery in Memory P’s better for words with high imagery ratings in a variety of tasks. Free recall Recognition memory Visual word recognition “Is it a word” Semantic Categorization Task E.g., “Does this word refer to something you can consume?”
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Imagery in Memory - Mnemonics Forming mental images is a superior study strategy to rote rehearsal or generating Imagining items interacting results in memory improvements, especially if the interaction is bizarre. Bizarreness itself is not a mechanism, it just enhances the relative salience of the image (McDaniel & Einstein, 1986)
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Dual Coding Theory – Paivio (1969) Posits distinct cognitive systems Two different types of information in long-term memory While all words draw upon lexical systems, concrete concepts draw upon additional visual codes Abstract concepts have only verbal codes, and are thus at a processing disadvantage relative to concrete concepts
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Relatively Impoverished Are we really better at processing concrete concepts because they have more stuff? Or, does concreteness have other effects?
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This note was uploaded on 09/10/2009 for the course PSYCH 365 taught by Professor Penny during the Fall '09 term at University of Calgary.

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Psychology 365 Lecture 26 (March 25) Ian - Outline Visual...

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