{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

word-08-6 - In a Word 3.2 Concepts 2 What are concepts Two...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In a Word 3.2 Concepts 2
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What are concepts?
Background image of page 2
Two Separate Questions: What are  concepts ? What is the relationship between  words  and  concepts ?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Some words correspond to concepts  (LOVE, TABLE,  ANACRHONISM) They are part of the Conceptual Lexicon Other words correspond to grammatical building  blocks  (the, a, will, ‘s) They are part of the Functional Lexicon.  
Background image of page 4
Very important: Prototype theory  tells us that concepts have core and  periphery, but  it does not tell us how  the core is  determined .   It tells us that not all birds are as good tokens of the  concept  BIRD , but it does not tell us  why and how exactly,  ROBIN  came to be more prototypical,  conceptually, than  TURKEY.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Prototype theory tells us how we  organize  conceptual knowledge, but  not how we gain it or what, exactly, it  is.
Background image of page 6
So, we have  checklist theories , which  tell us that what  concepts are: they are fairly precise , and  they can be  decomposed  into a small set of principles (also known as  Atomic  Globule Theories ).  They (try) to tell us about the ‘inner’  structure of any given concepts. And we have  prototype theories  which tell us that  concepts are not precise , and that  decomposing concepts is  not  how humans represent concepts.  However, they do  not actually tell us what the ‘inner’ structure of any given  concept is.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
We have seen the limits  of  Checklist Theories We have also seen at least one limit of  Prototype Theories : they do not actually  tell us  how  we construct concepts and  what they are.
Background image of page 8
 Some words cannot be  interpreted in isolation. For  instance, take  BIG, SMALL,  GOOD Some more Limitations of  Prototype Theory:
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The  BIG   BUTTERFLY  butterfly landed on  the roses The  SMALL   TANK  rolled on  the loan
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Similarly: In February, John finally realized he needs  GOOD UMBRELLA I had a  GOOD MEAL  yesterday Jane is  a GOOD TEACHER teacher GOOD=  functional GOOD  =  tasty GOOD =  competent
Background image of page 12
GOOD  for an  UMBRELLA GOOD  for a  MEAL GOOD  for a  TEACHER All these adjectives are defined  relative to a scale   which is provided by the noun.
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
So, how many  SMALL  are there? How many  BIG  are there? How many  GOOD  are there?
Background image of page 14
Fast boat : a boat that travels fast Fast book : *a book that travels fast Fast for a boat ???Fast for a book So,  fast   cannot  be defined  relative to a scale   which is provided by the noun.
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}