08-18 - Brain and Language II November 11, 2008 Wernicke's...

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Brain and Language II Brain and Language II November 11, 2008
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Damage to Wernicke’s area Damage to Wernicke’s area ( ( Wernicke’s Aphasia Wernicke’s Aphasia ): ): Wernicke’s aphasia is primarily characterized by poor speech  comprehension and production of meaningless speech.  It is fluent and unlabored with no straining to articulate or find words.  The speech is usually grammatical but the words strung together do not  make sense.  Failing surround especially production and comprehension of substantive  (content) words. Examiner: How are you today, Mrs. A.? Patient: Yes Examiner: Have I ever tested you before Patient: No, I mean I haven’t. Examiner: Can you tell me what your name is? Patient: No, I don’t I … right I’m right now here Examiner: What is your address? Patient: I could if I can help these this like you know… to  make it.  We are seeing for him. That is my  father.
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Examiner:  What kind of work did you do  before you came into the hospital?  Patient:  Never, now mista oyge I wanna tell  you this happened when happened  when  he rent. His - his kell come  down here  and is - he got ren  something.  It happened. In thesse  ropiers were with  him for hi - is friend - like  was. And it just  happened so I don’t know,  he did not bring around  anything. And he  did not pay it. And he roden all  o these  arranjen from the pedis on from iss pescid
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One cannot assume that such patients do not  understand just because they do not give a proper  answer. We must test their comprehension using  other tasks such as asking them to point to an object.  When we do this they invariably fail at the task.  Wernicke’s aphasics appear to be unaware of their  problem. They do not look puzzled when someone  says something to them even though they cannot  understand what is being said. Furthermore, they  follow social conventions such as turn-taking in  conversations
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Even when patients do recognize that something is wrong,  they do not seem to know what the problem is.  Consider the following (from Kertesz, 1980). Examiner:  Can you tell me a little bit about why  you’re  here.  Patient:  I don’t know whata wasa down here for  me, I  just don’t know why I wasn’t with up  here,  at all you, it  was neva, had it been  walked me  today ta died.  Examiner:  Uh huh. Okay.   Patient:   Sine just don’t know why, what is really  wrong,  I don’t know, cause I can eaten treffren  eatly an  everythin like that I’m all right at  home.
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Because Wernicke’s area is part of the auditory 
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This note was uploaded on 09/10/2009 for the course LING 110Lg taught by Professor Borer during the Fall '07 term at USC.

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08-18 - Brain and Language II November 11, 2008 Wernicke's...

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