Chapter 2

Chapter 2 - Chapter 2: America's Changing National...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 2: America’s Changing National Interest?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
National Interest What’s good for a country in international relations as decided by governing elites Subject to change: What seems to be a national interest one year, may turn out to be a mistake next year—based on hindsight (Vietnam; Iran; Iraq) National Interest Concept is unchanging: In international relations no eternal friends and no eternal enemies; only eternal interests. National interests close to home: Staying secure and sovereign Typically, objective. National interests far away: Typically, subjective Controversial Often disputed: Query: Is a far away land “vital” to our security and national interest? Declaration of Independence Divergent interests of American colonies and Britain: War of Independence Declaration of Independence. Colonists’ aims: Free security Westward expansion No taxes Open trade Declaration of Independence War of Independence: Convergence of interests between colonists and France Colonists wanted to defeat Britain France wanted Britain weakened Brought France to Colonists’ aid (My enemy’s enemy is my friend) Manifest Destiny Declared U.S. national interest in becoming a continent-wide power secure from European threats and uninvolved in Europe’s wars
Background image of page 2
New U. S. adjusted its national interest to secure itself as a small power on a continent where several competing European powers also claimed holdings. Isolationism Manifest Destiny U.S. strategy (ends, ways, and means): U.S. used cash and/or force and ousted Europeans Acquired Louisiana territories (from France), Florida (from Spain), the Southwest, Oregon (from Britain), California (from Mexico), and Alaska (From Russia). Two real setbacks in 19 th century: Inability to seize Canada The burning of Washington in the War of 1812. Manifest Destiny U.S. policy of neutrality and isolationism: In his Farewell address, George Washington warned against “entangling alliances” with European powers But U.S. wanted trade with Europe and sell grain This led to war of 1812 with Britain, in which U.S. tried, unsuccessfully, to seize Canada The British burned down the capital and the White House and left Manifest Destiny The Monroe Doctrine (1823): To keep Europe out of Western hemisphere, declared U.S. opposition to European interference in the Americas Imperialism Spreading a nation’s power and control over other lands U.S. embarked on overseas expansion: Freed Cuba from Spanish misrule Perceived economic need To gain foreign market for American goods Imperialism Mahan’s theory of expansion by sea power Social Darwinism: Encouraged many Americans, including Teddy Roosevelt, to see themselves as the “fittest” in the White Man’s Burden to “civilize” third world barbarians!
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Imperialism American empire. In 1898, the United States took Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, Guam, Hawaii, and Wake Island
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

Chapter 2 - Chapter 2: America's Changing National...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online