Lab 1 - Lab 1 Human Electro-Oculography(EOG For the first...

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Lab 1- Human Electro-Oculography (EOG) For the first lab week we will be conducting the EOG lab, answering a few questions about eye movements and familiarizing ourselves with the data acquisition system we'll be using for the coming labs. Movements of our eyes can be tracked by following the movement of the steady potential produced across the eye (As depicted in Figure 1). This potential is quite small so we'll need to amplify this bio-electric signal many orders of magnitude. This is accomplished using the Bio- amplifiers at each lab station. As the cornea-retinal potential is steady we record EOGs only when the eye moves , this differs from a bio-electric signal that changes over time (such as an action potential). The human eye is capable of two types of movements: 1.) smooth pursuit movements and 2.) fast repositioning movements (called saccades). In some individuals smooth eye pursuits are interrupted by fast repositioning movements. This condition is called nystagmus . In lab I will describe the experimental setup in detail.
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This note was uploaded on 09/11/2009 for the course BIO 240 taught by Professor Schulz during the Fall '09 term at Occidental.

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Lab 1 - Lab 1 Human Electro-Oculography(EOG For the first...

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