Unit 2 - Chapter 7 Mercantilism- economic system of the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 7 Mercantilism- economic system of the major trading nations during the 16th, 17th, and 18th cent., based on the premise that national wealth and power were best served by increasing exports and collecting precious metals in return. Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and Oliver Cromwell conformed their policies to mercantilism Navigation Acts- in English history, name given to certain parliamentary legislation, more properly called the British Acts of Trade. The acts were an outgrowth of mercantilism, and followed principles laid down by Tudor and early Stuart trade regulations George Grenville- 1712—70, British statesman, brother of Earl Temple. He entered Parliament in 1741, held several cabinet posts, and in 1763 became chief minister. His prosecution (1763) of John Wilkes provoked political reformers, and his attempt to tax the North American colonies internally through the Stamp Act raised opposition not only in America but also among the British commercial classes Sons of Liberty- secret organizations formed in the American colonies in protest against the Stamp Act (1765). They took their name from a phrase used by Isaac Barré in a speech against the Stamp Act in Parliament, and were organized by merchants, businessmen, lawyers, journalists, and others who would be most affected by the Stamp Act. The leaders included John Lamb and Alexander McDougall in New York, and Samuel Adams and James Otis in New England Patrick Henry- 1736—99, political leader in the American Revolution, b. Hanover co., Va. Largely self-educated, he became a prominent trial lawyer. Henry bitterly denounced (1765) the Stamp Act and in the years that followed helped fan the fires of revolt in the South. As an orator he knew no equal. Several phrases attributed to him–e.g., "If this be treason, make the most of it" and "Give me liberty or give me death" –are familiar to all Americans. Henry became a leader among the so-called radicals and spoke clearly for individual liberties Non-importation agreements- petition against British goods and the Stamp Act Whigs- A member of an 18th- and 19th-century British political party that was opposed to the Tories.  Supporter of the war against England during the American Revolution. Charles Townshend- 1725—67, English statesman; grandson of the 2d Viscount Townshend. Distrusted for his marked instability, he held relatively minor offices until the 1st earl of Chatham made him chancellor of the exchequer in 1766 Boston Massacre- 1770, pre-Revolutionary incident growing out of the resentment against the British troops sent to Boston to maintain order and to enforce the Townshend Acts. The troops, constantly tormented by irresponsible gangs, finally (Mar. 5, 1770) fired into a rioting crowd and killed five men–three on the spot, two of wounds later. The funeral of the victims was the occasion for a great patriot demonstration. The British captain, Thomas Preston, and his men were tried for murder, with Robert Treat Paine as prosecutor, John Adams and Josiah Quincy as
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/12/2009 for the course HISTORY 39003 taught by Professor Norena during the Fall '09 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Page1 / 16

Unit 2 - Chapter 7 Mercantilism- economic system of the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online