The Jacksonian Era

The Jacksonian Era - The Jacksonian Era which has been...

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The Jacksonian Era, which has been celebrated as the era of the  “common man,” is characterized fully in the category of reformation and the  economic development. Jacksonian policies included ending the bank of the  United States, expanding westward, and removing American Indians from  the Southeast. Jackson was a firm believer in a specie basis for currency, and  the Specie Circular in 1836. Jackson was denounced as a tyrant by opponents  on both ends of the political spectrum such as Henry Clay and John C.  Calhoun.   Jackson   created   a   system   to   clear   out   elected   officials   in  government   of   an   opposing   party   and   replace   them   with   Jacksonian  Democrats. Jackson’s firm belief  stipulated that all public lands must be  paid for in specie. His  belief also  broke the speculation boom in Western  lands.  It  cast   suspicion   on   many   of   the   bank   notes   in   circulation,   and 
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The Jacksonian Era - The Jacksonian Era which has been...

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