Lecture 02 - webnotes - Classical Greece The Roman Empire...

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Lecture 2: The prehistory of globalization, 1000 BC to 1500 AD Classical Greece The Roman Empire The Umayyad Caliphate The Silk Road The Indian Rim The Commercial Revolution
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The prehistory of globalization Task: to get a handle on the contours of the global economy before 1500. Rather than trying to encompass all the history of all the countries of the globe, we’ll look at some prominent examples.
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Classical Greece Certainly not the first instance of inter- regional trade: •Obsidian of Asia Minor from 3000 B.C. •Linkages between Mesopotamia and Indus River Valley from 2000 B.C. However, this is one of the best documented examples of early trade.
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Classical Greece Full flowering of Greek trade took place somewhere between 600 to 300 B.C. This period, of course, represents the “Golden Age” of many of its city-states, particularly Athens. Think Socrates, Plato, Aristotle…
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Classical Greece Archaeological evidence suggests Greek trade goods in India, Persia, Russia, Britain, Switzerland, Bavaria, France, Sweden… This network was also supplemented by the establishment of trading colonies.
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Classical Greece Circa 550 BC
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Classical Greece Much of this trade arose from population constraints around 800 B.C.
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Classical Greece Much of Greece is dry, mountainous, and/or infertile, making food supplies hard to come. So, the Greek city-states supplemented
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Classical Greece Thus, a fully developed inter-regional division of labor was formed: – Greece supplied olive oil, pottery, textiles, and fish sauce. – The Black Sea ports supplied cotton, timber, hides, and—vitally—grains.
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Classical Greece Consequently, the Greeks grew rich, allowing for the cultural outpouring known today. Also allowing for bitter conflict among city-states and attracting the attention of revenue-hungry outsiders.
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Classical Greece From 400 B.C., Greece slipped into economic stagnation as conflict bleed their coffers. City-states supplanted by other peoples.
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The Roman Empire Roman Empire reaches its peak between 90 and 215 A.D. One of the most important aspects of the Roman economy was the degree of
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This geographical specialization lead to a common market centered on the Mediterranean (=“middle of the earth”). Direct and indirect evidence on this, e.g.
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2009 for the course ECONOMICS Econ 382 taught by Professor Davidjack during the Spring '09 term at Simon Fraser.

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Lecture 02 - webnotes - Classical Greece The Roman Empire...

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