Lecture 08 - webnotes - Introduction Involuntary flows...

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Lecture 8: Globalization & immigration Introduction Involuntary flows Wages & immigration
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Introduction Up to this point, we have been relatively quiet about immigration. We know that: a.) a lot of it went on in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, b.) not so much of it in mid-century, c.) and a lot more at end of the century.
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Introduction Foreign-born as a Percentage of New World Population 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 0.16 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000
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Introduction Are goal for today is to “flesh out” these developments in a lot more detail. In particular, we will be interested in: a.) the role of immigration in subsequent economic development. b.) the role of policy in determining immigration levels.
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Involuntary flows from Africa No discussion of immigration can really be complete without first considering the Transatlantic slave trade. Much of our focus will be on voluntary flows of people and their impact on host economies.
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Involuntary flows from Africa Began in 1510 with the first shipment of slaves to Panama via Spain. A long-standing precedent of slavery in much of the Old World, e.g. East Africa to the Middle East. Distinction: more harsh conditions and
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Involuntary flows from Africa Flows remained low through the 1500s, Increases over time with: a.) rising demand for tropical products in the Old World, b.) the expansion of areas of settlement in the New World,
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Involuntary flows from Africa 1500-1600: .07 million 1600-1700: 1.4 million 1700-1760: 2.9 million 1760-1820: 4.3 million 1820-1850: 2.0 million? Flows centered on South America (Brazil) and the Caribbean (3/4 of the 10+ million).
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Involuntary flows from Africa Differing resource endowments have been used to explain the divergence in economic outcomes in the Americas. Line of reasoning: resource endowments affected crop decisions and historical accident affected the nationality of colonizers.
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Involuntary flows from Africa a.) a lack of land suitable for plantation agriculture (i.e. no economies of scale in production, so no need for “gang” labor) b.) plus initial institutions can explain the differences between the
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There is also an emerging literature on the consequences of slavery on Africa. Nunn: slave shipments leads to
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Lecture 08 - webnotes - Introduction Involuntary flows...

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