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umts - UMTS Protocols and Protocol Testing Definition...

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Web ProForum Tutorials http://www.iec.org Copyright © The International Engineering Consortium 1/45 UMTS Protocols and Protocol Testing Definition Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) is envisioned as the successor to Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM). UMTS signals the move into the third generation (3G) of mobile networks. UMTS also addresses the growing demand of mobile and Internet applications for new capacity in the overcrowded mobile communications sky. The new network increases transmission speed to 2 Mbps per mobile user and establishes a global roaming standard. Overview UMTS, also referred to as wideband code division multiple access (W–CDMA), is one of the most significant advances in the evolution of telecommunications into 3G networks. UMTS allows many more applications to be introduced to a worldwide base of users and provides a vital link between today’s multiple GSM systems and the ultimate single worldwide standard for all mobile telecommunications, International Mobile Telecommunications–2000 (IMT– 2000). This tutorial explores the history of mobile communications leading to the proposal of UMTS. The tutorial then explains the architecture of UMTS and the protocols, interfaces, and technologies that go along with it. Finally, this tutorial looks at UMTS measurement and testing where tutorial participants will find real-world situations with practical suggestions for measurement approaches. Topics 1. Evolution of Mobile Communications 2. UMTS Network Architecture 3. UMTS Interfaces 4. UMTS and UTRAN Measurement Objectives 5. Appendix Self-Test Correct Answers
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Web ProForum Tutorials http://www.iec.org Copyright © The International Engineering Consortium 2/45 Glossary 1. Evolution of Mobile Communications Early Stages: 1G to 3G Electromagnetic waves were first discovered as a communications medium at the end of the 19th century. The first systems offering mobile telephone service (car phone) were introduced in the late 1940s in the United States and in the early 1950s in Europe. Those early single cell systems were severely constrained by restricted mobility, low capacity, limited service, and poor speech quality. The equipment was heavy, bulky, expensive, and susceptible to interference. Because of those limitations, less than one million subscribers were registered worldwide by the early 1980s. First Generation (1G): Analog Cellular The introduction of cellular systems in the late 1970s and early 1980s represented a quantum leap in mobile communication (especially in capacity and mobility). Semiconductor technology and microprocessors made smaller, lighter weight, and more sophisticated mobile systems a practical reality for many more users. These 1G cellular systems still transmit only analog voice information. The most prominent 1G systems are Advanced Mobile Phone System (AMPS), Nordic Mobile Telephone (NMT), and Total Access Communication System (TACS).
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