rships09_syllabus

rships09_syllabus - Cornell University Department of Human...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cornell University Department of Human Development HD 3620:  Human Bonding Spring 2009 Instructor: Professor Cindy Hazan, MVR EB04  Office Hours: Tuesday, 3:00 – 4:30 (walk-in), and by appointment (ch34) Admin Assistant: Joe Myer, MVR G77h (255.3074) Blackboard Site: HD3620-Hazan-Spring2009 Graduate TAs: Yu Fu (yf72), Monday, 2:30 – 3:30, Martha’s Contact regarding special needs for exams. Ryan Mitchell (rsm236), Tuesday, 11-12, MVR B40 Contact regarding extra credit. Daphna Ram (dr239), Thursday, 3-4, MVR G60d Contact regarding exam grading.  Yi Shao (ys249), Tuesday, 3-4, MVR G78 Contact regarding Blackboard site. Zhana Vrangalova (sv99), Wednesday, 2-3, MVR B40 Contact regarding permission for a make-up exam. Claire Yang (yy257), Thursday, 11:30 – 12:30, MVR G78 Contact regarding scheduling for a make-up exam. Lectures: Course Description:  As members of a highly social species humans have long been concerned with understanding interpersonal relationships  but it is only in the last couple of decades that researchers have begun applying the methods of modern psychological  science to the task.  It is now well documented that our day-to-day well being, our overall psychological adjustment, and  even our physical health depend in large part on the quality of our relationships with other people.  Our continuance as a  species turned on the successful negotiation of three major adaptive challenges:  surviving to reproductive age, mating,  and providing adequate care to our young so that they too survive to reproduce.  Social relationships lie at the core of all  three.  Indeed, dependence on and interdependence with our conspecifics is a fundamental fact of the human condition.   The relatively new science of relationships encompasses a large heterogeneous and multi-disciplinary field of theory and  research.  This course will examine human bonding primarily from a psychological perspective, drawing on empirical and  theoretical work from the fields of developmental, clinical, evolutionary, cognitive, personality, and social psychology,  and secondarily from ethology, anthropology, sociology, and neurobiology.  The central goal of the course is to define and  explain the basic structure, functions, dynamics, and formation of human affectional bonds, especially those of the  attachment and mating variety.  Although the course covers all periods of development beginning with infancy, more  than two-thirds of the lectures and readings focus on adulthood.   Required Reading:  [At the Campus Store and on reserve at Mann and Uris libraries.] A course packet has been assembled from a wide range of sources, including books, edited volumes, and scientific 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 6

rships09_syllabus - Cornell University Department of Human...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online