Netsilik eskimo

Netsilik eskimo - and along with the wooden sledge they are...

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11am Discussion The Netsilik Eskimo Ch. 1, 2, 5, 6 The Netsilik use many different types of tools all with various functions Interesting how there is a difference between a man’s knife and a woman’s knife 2 kinds of skin are used in Netsilik society, caribou skin and seal skin o These 2 skins are vitally important because of the many uses they have. Bone is also important because driftwood was so scarce and iron was not known o With all of these tools, the Netsilik were able to survive and adapt to one of the harshest environments known to man. They basically got everything they needed from stone, the animals they killed, and the snow that surrounded them. Just like some other societies we have studied, while women are in camp busy with their daily chores, the men hunt for food The staple food in July is fish Kayaks are very important to the netsilik, one of their most valuable possessions
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Unformatted text preview: and along with the wooden sledge they are both used extensively in inland travel and in hunting the caribou The stone weir is a key for fishing Very interesting how the netsilik catch caribou. They dig pits in deep mounds of snows and place knives in the bottom and wait for them to fall in. Late fall is the womens busiest time because during this seasons they make the new fur clothing The Netsilik have to adapt to the weather changes because of their shelter situation. The igloos melt in the spring, so some people choose not to have a roof and others set up camp somewhere else. Two primary migration phases the winter on the sea ice hunting seals and the summer inland fishing and hunting caribou A traditional winter camp size is about 90 people and is composed of a number of extended families There are 14 parts of seal meat and each is described very thoroughly...
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2009 for the course ANTH 263 taught by Professor Boehm during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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