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3830TextAnswersCh2

3830TextAnswersCh2 - CHAPTER TWO ANSWERS TO REVIEW...

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Page 1-1 CHAPTER TWO ANSWERS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS 2.1 What does SQL stand for? SQL stands for Structured Query Language. 2.2 What does DML stand for? What are DML statements? DML stands for data manipulation language . DML statements are used for querying and modifying data. 2.3 What does DDL stand for? What are DDL statements? DDL stands for data definition language . DDL statements are used for creating tables, relationships and other database querying and modifying data. 2.4 Summarize the background of SQL. SQL was developed by IBM in the late 1970s, and in 1992 it was endorsed as a national standard by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). That version is called SQL-92. There is a later version called SQL3 that has some object-oriented concepts, but SQL3 has not received much commercial attention. 2.5 What is SQL-92? How does it relate to the SQL statements in this chapter? SQL-92 is the version of SQL endorsed as a national standard by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) in 1992. It is the version of SQL supported by most commonly used database management systems. The SQL statements in the chapter are based on SQL-92. 2.6 What is SQL described as a data sublanguage? A data sublanguage consists only of language statements for defining and processing a database. To obtain a full programming language, SQL statements must be embedded in scripting languages such as VBScript or in programming languages such as Java or C#. 2.7 Describe three ways of using SQL. SQL can be used to: Submit statements directly for DBMS processing (either in native DBMS tools or Visual Studio.NET and other development tools). Embed statements into client/server applications. Embed statements in Web pages. Create statements in reporting and data extraction programs. 2.8 Explain how Access uses SQL. Access uses SQL, but generally hides the SQL from the user. For example, Access automatically generates SQL and sends it to the Access Jet DBMS every time you run a query, process a form or create a report. To go beyond elementary database processing, you need to know how to use SQL in Access.
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Page 1-2 To use SQL in Microsoft Access: Open a database. Create a new query by clicking the Queries tab in the left column of the database window. Click the New button on the top of the database window. Click the OK button to select the design view Click the Close button on the Show Table dialog box. In the Access menu bar, select View | SQL View. Enter an SQL statement in the Query window. In the Access menu bar, select Query | Run (there is an equivalent button – marked with an exclamation point [!] - in the toolbar). To save your query, select File | Save in the Access menu bar. 2.9 Explain how enterprise-class DBMS products use SQL.
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