3830TextAnswersCh1

3830TextAnswersCh1 - CHAPTER ONE ANSWERS TO REVIEW...

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CHAPTER ONE ANSWERS TO REVIEW QUESTIONS 1.1 Give an example of two related tables other than one in this book. Use the STUDENT and GRADE tables in Figure 1-1 as an example pattern for your tables. Name the tables and columns using the conventions in this book. This problem calls for only two tables, not three. Student answers will vary as each creates his or her own example. One example is a database to record membership information for a club or association. The two tables will be MEMBER, which records information about the person who is a member of the club or association, and PAYMENT, which records annual dues paid by the members over the years. The two tables to be created are: MEMBER (MemberNumber , MemberFirstName, MemberLastName, EmailAddress) and EMPLOYEE (PaymentNumber , MemberNumber , PaymentDate, PaymentAmount) A screen shot of the database as created in Access is shown on the next page. Answers to review questions 1.1-1.3 are contained in the database dbp10_im_ch01_RQ_Database.mdb
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1.2 Explain how the two tables you provided in question 1.1 are related. Student answers will vary as each creates his or her own example. In the example above, the tables MEMBER and PAYMENT are related by the field MemberNumber. This field is a unique identifier, or primary key, in MEMBER, and serves as a non-unique identifier or foreign key in PAYMENT where it is identified by which row in MEMBER is associated with that specific row in PAYMENT. One row in MEMBER can be associated with many rows in PAYMENT, since each MEMBER pays dues each year. This is shown in the Relationships window in the screen shot above. 1.3 Show your two tables from question 1.1 without the columns that represent the relationships. Explain how the value of your two tables is diminished without the relationships. The revised tables are shown in the screen shot on the next page. Without the MemberNumber column in PAYMENT, it is impossible to determine who made which payment. Therefore we do not know which MEMBERs have paid their annual dues in the various years.
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1.4 Define the terms data and information. Explain how the two terms differ. Data are facts and figures. Information is defined as knowledge derived from data, or as data presented in a meaningful context. Data is simply recorded in the database, but the data must be manipulated in some way to produce information. 1.5 Give an example of information that could be determined using the two tables you provided in your answer to question 1.1.
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Student answers will vary as each creates his or her own example. In the example above, information that could be determined from the membership database would include: Who is a current member of the club or association? Who was a member in previous years, but has not paid his or her dues this year?
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2009 for the course CS CS31 taught by Professor Camillo during the Spring '09 term at Grantham.

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3830TextAnswersCh1 - CHAPTER ONE ANSWERS TO REVIEW...

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