Oceanfloor_Lecture - Chapter 21: Ocean basins Next Lecture:...

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Geology of the ocean floor Ocean ridge system Ocean trench system Major mountain belts Continental drift Some puzzling data Chapter 21: Ocean basins Next Lecture: Chapter 22
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Geology of the ocean floor Ocean ridge system Ocean trench system Major mountain belts Continental drift Some puzzling data Chapter 21: Ocean basins Next Lecture: Chapter 22
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The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is a high elevation on the ocean floor as seen in this drawing of the ridge south of Iceland.
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The ridge at depth connects directly with a line of active volcanoes Source: IDDP
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Heimaey Volcano erupting
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About 90% of Iceland’s homes are heated by geothermal energy, and attempts to generate electricity are growing more ambitious. Geothermal power is potentially cheap, pollution free, and virtually inexhaustible.
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Iceland’s hydrothermal resources are used both for power generation (left) and relaxation in the warm waters of Blue Lagoon, whose silica mud is a prized beauty treatment.
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The Mid-Atlantic Ridge continues southward, maintaining a precise midway position between the Old World and New World. Fracture zones cut the ridge, offsetting segments of the ridge relatively to the left or to the right.
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Where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge swings sharply through a bend, individual segments are offset along fracture zones.
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As seen in profile, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between Brazil and western Africa is a topographically high region (albeit below sea level) that occupies approximately the central one-third of the Atlantic Ocean basin. To the left and right are volcanic seamounts 30:1 vertical exaggeration oceanworld.tamu.edu 180:1 vertical exaggeration
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From Buck, Lawvier and Poliakov (2005), Nature East Pacific Rise Mid-Atlantic Ridge Transform zone in Atlantic
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2009 for the course GEO 401 taught by Professor Lassiter during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Oceanfloor_Lecture - Chapter 21: Ocean basins Next Lecture:...

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