statistics_child_abuse - National Clearinghouse on Child...

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Unformatted text preview: National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information National Adoption Information Clearinghouse Gateways to Information: Protecting Children and Strengthening Families Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities: Statistics and Interventions National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information 330 C St., SW Washington, DC 20447 (800) 394-3366 or (703) 385-7565 nccanch@caliber.com http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov The Clearinghouses are services of The Childrens Bureau Administration for Children and Families U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Despite the efforts of the child protection system, child maltreatment fatalities remain a serious problem. 1 Although the untimely deaths of children due to illness and accidents have been closely monitored, deaths that result from physical assault or severe neglect can be more difficult to track. Intervention strategies targeted at resolving this problem face complex challenges. The National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) reported an estimated 1,400 child fatalities in 2002 . This translates to a rate of 1.98 children per 100,000 children in the general population. NCANDS defines child fatality as the death of a child caused by an injury resulting from abuse or neglect, or where abuse or neglect were contributing factors. Many researchers and practitioners believe child fatalities due to abuse and neglect are underreported. States definitions of key terms such as child homicide, abuse, and neglect vary (therefore, so do the numbers and types of child fatalities they report). In addition, some deaths officially labeled as accidents, child homicides, and/or Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) might be attributed to child abuse or neglect if more comprehensive investigations were conducted or if there were more consensus in the coding of abuse on death certificates. Recent studies in Colorado and North Carolina have estimated as many as 50 to 60 percent of deaths resulting from abuse or neglect are not recorded (Crume, DiGuiseppi, Byers, Sirotnak, Garrett, 2002; Herman-Giddens, Brown, Verbiest, Carlson, Hooten, et al., 1999). These studies indicate that neglect is the most underrecorded form of fatal maltreatment. Introduction Unless otherwise noted, statistics in this fact sheet are taken from Child Maltreatment 2002 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2004). How Many Children Die Each Year From Child Abuse or Neglect? 1 This fact sheet provides information regarding child deaths as a result of abuse or neglect by a parent or primary caregiver . Other child homicides, such as those committed by acquaintances and strangers, and other causes of death, such as unintentional injuries, are not discussed here. For information about leading causes of child death, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at http://webapp.cdc.gov/sasweb/ncipc/leadcaus10.html. Statistics regarding child homicide can be obtained from the U.S. Department of Justice at www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/homicide/homtrnd.htm. Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities: Statistics and Interventions...
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2009 for the course SOC 302 taught by Professor Langenkamp during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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statistics_child_abuse - National Clearinghouse on Child...

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