Bourbon Democracy2 - Bourbon Democracy (Lecture 1) I....

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Bourbon Democracy (Lecture 1) I. “Confederate Brigadiers” A. Turn to those who had led them in the Civil War – Radical Republicans replaced by Confederate war heroes B. These are the people who served in the government and were also former Rebel veterans C. There were a lot of Senators who were former Rebel veterans from the South i. One year all of Alabama’s senators were D. FYI: 7 of the 8 original faculty members of UT were ex-rebels E. Sometimes people would attach lofty war titles to their names to sound better as Democrats i. Some people got tired of this and said the Democrats needed plain people or at least someone who was just a soldier F. A dissenter named the new rulers o the South the Bourbons i. Saying that they were the same people who ruled before the war—members of the planter class ii. The guy who named them this said they learned nothing and know nothing II. Who Were the Leaders of “The New South”? **** A. Lewis Wynne i. Provisions of Georgia constitution reestablished planter class as important part of industrialization B. Woodward and the “Prussian Road” Thesis C. Doris Betts i. Barbershops and general stores focused on stock car drivers D. David L. Carleton i. Described towns people as not modern ii. Comes out on Woodward's side iii. 80% of textile were town merchants E. George Rogers, Jr. i. Found that post war leaders in Georgetown were not descendants of men in pre-war rather, just people in the government ii. Southerners became successful businessmen iii. Atlanta ring shared governorship F. Johnathan Weiner and Dwight Belling i. Opposed Woodward ii. Brought Marxist perspective iii. Focused on the process of modernization iv. Unlike woodward, they argued new southern leaders were if the old antebellum planter class v. Alabama- planters lost their slaves vi. Law 1866- gave merchants and planters equal lean, must pay off land before anyone else vii.NC provided capital needed to succeed for planters
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G. Those who ruled did like to consider themselves as a continuation of the old rule of the South but it is not true that they were the old members of the planter class come back to rule, says Woodward H. Woodward rejected the term bourbon because they were of a new class and not of the old regime i. They were a middle-class with more progressive minds ii. They were capitalistic director of their farms rather than agrarians I. They are also known as redeemers J. Jonathan Weiner
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i. Contradicted Woodward’s thesis ii. Maintains that the South traveled the Prussian road as Germany and Japan did iii. Argued that the New South leaders came from the planter class that was in place and power before the war iv. There was just a return to the traditional system of subordination of the blacks to work the plantations K. Dwight Billings i. Contradicted Woodward’s thesis ii. Maintains that the South traveled the Prussian road as Germany and Japan did iii. Argued that the New South leaders came from the planter class that was in place
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Bourbon Democracy2 - Bourbon Democracy (Lecture 1) I....

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