Lesson 2 - Key Terms and Concepts Peripheral/Core Countries(and examples of Developing/Developed Countries Less/More Developed Countries Demography

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Key Terms and Concepts - Peripheral/Core Countries (and examples of) - Developing/Developed Countries - Less/More Developed Countries - Demography - Density (types; limiting factors) - Natural Increase; Rate of Natural Increase - Birth Rates - Death Rates - Growth Rates - Fertility - Mortality - Migration - Doubling Time (conditions required for its estimation) - Migration; Immigration - Push and Pull factors - Internal Migration; Forced Migration - Revolutions (Agricultural, Industrial, Medical) - Carrying Capacity Introduction Take a minute to think back. .. a few generations. - How many children did your great grandparents have? - How many did your grandparents have? - How many brothers or sisters do you have? - Are children in your future? If so, how many do you plan to have? If your answers to these questions decreased in number or remained the same with each successive generation, you are not alone. In most North American and European countries today, people have fewer or the same number of siblings as their parents and grandparents. This is not the case, however, in other regions of the world especially those containing primarily peripheral countries (also called developin g countries or less developed countries , LDCs ). In general, the number of children per household is higher in peripheral countries than core countries (also called developed countries or more developed countries , MDCs ). High population growth in peripheral countries not only places additional strain on the people and the country themselves, but also on their environment. A side note: How big is the world's population? The world's population is now over six billion (approximately 6,743,000,000 as of January 2009 according to the US Census Bureau) . . . but, how big is that? It can be hard to comprehend just how large very big numbers are. Six billion is more than 600 times the
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population of Michigan (about 10,000,000). That's about how many total hairs are on the heads of 60,000 typical people! Imagine that the United States had four times as many people as it does now (approx. 305,000,000) -- that would be a little over one billion -- and that is how many people actually live in India, which has only about one third the area of the U.S.! Now that you have a better idea of how large one billion is, think about this. ...for every one of the over six billion people on Earth, there are one billion insects! Studying population, from the global to national to state to local scale, provides a basis for understanding a wide range of issues concerning people-environment interactions. Knowledge of an area's population size and distribution is essential to addressing problems such as food supply, pollution, energy and goods use (consumption or production), economic growth, and resource management. From another perspective, the physical environment helps to dictate how the world's population
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2009 for the course ISS 731 taught by Professor A.arbogast during the Summer '09 term at Michigan State University.

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Lesson 2 - Key Terms and Concepts Peripheral/Core Countries(and examples of Developing/Developed Countries Less/More Developed Countries Demography

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