lesson 3 - Key Terms and Concepts Defining global...

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Key Terms and Concepts Defining global geographic regions: - how regions are defined (i.e., questions asked) - problems associated with defining and portraying regions - possible distinguishing characteristics of geographic regions - criteria was used to produce the global geographic regions in our lesson Know the names of all of the world geographic regions and their general characteristics. Introduction In the last lesson you were introduced to some of the ways people influence their environment and, in turn, how the environment influences people. You learned that the environment often dictates where people live, the activities that take place there, and even the quality of life of those people. People, on the other hand, have made great use of their surroundings and, in doing so, a considerable and lasting impact on the natural landscape. Like the methods and tools you learned about in the Space & Place Lesson, geographers are always working to understand the relationship between people and place. One way this can be accomplished is by defining regions. Example of global regions. World map showing political regions. Image sources: BNW (2008) This last lesson in a series of three lessons introducing you to the discipline of geography, will explore some real world examples of how geographers attempt to describe and define the world around them. In the beginning of the course you learned that things in space can be grouped by their similarities or divided by their differences. It is precisely in this way that regions or areas can be defined such that variables within a region will share certain characteristics. For instance. ..
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a soil geographer may want to develop global soil regions, or a demographer may want to develop global population regions, or a geomorphologist may want to develop global landform/landscape regions, or a political scientist may want to develop global regions based on types of political values, or a plant biologist may want to develop global regions based on plant type, or a sociologist may want to develop global regions based on societal structuring, etc. Example of global regions. World map showing aquatic and terrestrial floristic regions. Larger version of the image. Regions Defining regions At this point, defining regions probably seems fairly straightforward. In fact, you may have already thought of a few yourselves, like the Midwest, the South, or the Pacific Northwest. While these are some good examples of regions in the U.S., defining regions is rarely that simple and there are many problematic issues associated with defining any type of region whether based on the functions it serves (such as a city, county, or state), location, shared characteristics, or a combination of all three. Regardless of the problems associated with developing regions, especially at the global scale,
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2009 for the course ISS 731 taught by Professor A.arbogast during the Summer '09 term at Michigan State University.

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lesson 3 - Key Terms and Concepts Defining global...

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