Chapter+4_Stoichiometry

Chapter+4_Stoichiometry - 2009/1/26 Chapter 4.1 Chemical...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2009/1/26 1 Chapter 4.1 Chemical Quantities (Stoichiometry) Reaction Stoichiometry The numerical relationships between chemical amounts in a reaction is called stoichiometry . Why do we study stoichiometry? --- Suppose you are a manager at Eli Lilly. The company plans to produce 1,000 lb of a certain drug next month. One of the raw materials needed is ethanol. How much ethanol do you need to order? 2 Chemical Equations Symbolic representation of a chemical reaction that shows: 1. reactants on the left and products on the right; 2. States of matter for each; 3. relative amounts of each using stoichiometric coefficients. 3 Chemical Equations Points to remember: A coefficient operates on all the atoms in the formula that follows it; Chemical formulas cannot be altered when balancing equations; No other reactants or products can be added when balancing equations; Use the smallest whole number to balance equations. 4
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2009/1/26 2 Chemical Equations Balance the chemical equation for the reaction of NH 3 burning in oxygen gas to form 5 Chemical Equations Balance the chemical equation for the reaction of C 7 H 16 burning in oxygen gas to form carbon dioxide and water. 6 Concept of Reaction Stoichiometry 1 crust + 5 ounces of tomato sauce + 2 cups of cheese 1 pizza How many pizzas can we make if we have 6 cups of cheese and enough supply of other ingredients?   pizzas 3 pizzas ? cheese of cups 2 pizza 1 cheese of cups 6 pizzas ? cheese of cups 6 pizzas ? cheese of cups 2 pizza 1 7 Concept of Reaction Stoichiometry A balanced chemical equation is like a recipe. ? H C of moles 6 from produced be can CO of moles many How 18 8 2 O H 18 CO 16 O 25 H C 2 2 2 2 18 8 8
Background image of page 2
2009/1/26 3 Stoichiometric Calculations From the mass of Substance A you can use the ratio of the coefficients of A and B to calculate the mass of Substance B formed (if it’s a product) or used (if it’s a reactant) 9 10 Example – Estimate the mass of CO 2 produced in 2004 by the combustion of 3.4 x 10 15 g gasoline assuming that gasoline is octane, C 8 H 18 , the equation for the reaction is: 2 C 8 H 18 ( l ) + 25 O
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

Chapter+4_Stoichiometry - 2009/1/26 Chapter 4.1 Chemical...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online