prob.part20.41_42 - 1.2. DISCRETE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 1.2. DISCRETE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS 33 1 2 3 1 2 3 8 16 32 64 20 32 48 64 64 32 44 56 Number of games A has won Number of games B has won Figure 1.9: Pascal’s table. quicker and neater, which I would like to tell you here in a few words: for henceforth I would like to open my heart to you, if I may, as I am so overjoyed with our agreement. I see that truth is the same in Toulouse as in Paris. Here, more or less, is what I do to show the fair value of each game, when two opponents play, for example, in three games and each person has staked 32 pistoles. Let us say that the first man had won twice and the other once; now they play another game, in which the conditions are that, if the first wins, he takes all the stakes; that is 64 pistoles; if the other wins it, then they have each won two games, and therefore, if they wish to stop playing, they must each take back their own stake, that is, 32 pistoles each. Then consider, Sir, if the first man wins, he gets 64 pistoles; if he loses he gets 32. Thus if they do not wish to risk this last game but wish to separate without playing it, the first man must say: ‘I am certain to get...
View Full Document

Page1 / 2

prob.part20.41_42 - 1.2. DISCRETE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online