geosc2 - 1 Dave Janesko is explaining the great Sevier...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. Dave Janesko is explaining the great Sevier Fault to Dr.  Alley and the CAUSE class.  On the left, red rocks deposited in a lake extend off to  Bryce National Park. On the right, black lava flows, now  cooled and hardened, are visible. The rocks meet at the  Sevier Fault.  What happened here?   A. B. C. D. E. The spreading that opened Death Valley affected a lot of the west, all the way over to Bryce Canyon in Utah.  The Sevier Fault, just west of Bryce, formed as pull-apart action broke the rocks, allowing younger rocks  including the black lava flow to drop down next to older rocks including the red lake sediments. There really are  cases where lava hardens in cracks, or where lava flows fill valleys, but a careful examination of the rocks here  shows that the lake sediments have not been heated by really nearby lava, so these lake sediments and the  lava must have been placed together after the lava cooled. Push-together faulting, and landslides, do occur, but  not here. Points Earned: 1/1 Your Response: B 2. Death Valley is getting wider: A. False
Background image of page 2
B. True Using techniques such as GPS (Global Positioning System), scientists have measured the distance between  the two sides of the valley, and across the Great Basin from western Utah to eastern California including Death  Valley. They found that each year the Great Basin, including Death Valley, is widening an inch or so, roughly as  fast as your fingernails grow. Points Earned: 1/1 Your Response: B 3. The picture at left shows river gravels in the  bottom of Death Valley.  Based on the lesson materials for this unit, a  likely explanation for this occurrence of river  gravels in the valley bottom is:  A. B. C. D. E. Faulting dropped the valley (or raised the mountains, or more likely both), and the melting snows of the  mountains feed rivers that carry rocks down into the valley, slowly filling it up while lowering the mountains.  There really are deep canyons that were carved by rivers, but as we saw in class and online, Death Valley is  not one of them. Rivers don’t run on the tops of mountains to deposit gravels. And Daisy was more into shorts  than into long jumps.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Points Earned: 0/1 Your Response: A 4. We believe that convection occurs in the Earth’s mantle because: A. Graham Spanier is completely melted, and he drives  convection in the mantle. B.
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/16/2009 for the course GEO 010 taught by Professor Alley during the Fall '07 term at Penn State.

Page1 / 13

geosc2 - 1 Dave Janesko is explaining the great Sevier...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online