63885-Ch26 - JIT & Lean-3e-S 11-06/06, 06/05/07 Chapter...

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JIT & Lean-3e-S 11-06/06, 06/05/07 Chapter 26 Just-In-Time and Lean Production REVIEW QUESTIONS 26.1 Define lean production. Answer: As defined in the text, lean production means doing more and more work with fewer and fewer resources. It also means giving customers what they want and satisfying or surpassing their expectations. 26.2 Name the two pillars of the Toyota production system. Answer: The two pillars of the Toyota production system are (1) just-in-time production and (2) autonomation (automation with a human touch). 26.3 What is the Japanese word for waste? Answer: Muda. 26.4 Name four of the seven forms of waste in production, as identified by Taiichi Ohno. Answer: Taiichi Ohno’s seven forms of waste are (1) production of defective parts, (2) production of more than the number of items needed (overproduction), (3) excessive inventories, (4) unnecessary processing steps, (5) unnecessary movement of people, (6) unnecessary transport and handling of materials, and (7) workers waiting. 26.5 What are three reasons why people and materials are sometimes moved unnecessarily in production operations? Answer : The reasons given in the text are (1) inefficient workplace layout, (2) inefficient plant layout, (3) Improper material handling method, (4) production machines spaced too far apart, (5) larger equipment than necessary for the task, (6) conventional batch production. 26.6 What is a just-in-time production system? Answer: As defined in the text, a just-in-time production system produces and delivers exactly the required number of each component to the downstream operation in the manufacturing sequence just at the time when that component is needed. Each component is delivered "just in time." 26.7 What is the objective of a just-in-time production system? Answer: As indicated in the text, the primary objective of a just-in-time production system is to minimize inventories, especially work-in-process inventories. 26.8 What is the difference between a push system and a pull system in production control? Answer: In a pull system of production control, the order to make and deliver parts at each workstation in the production sequence comes from the downstream station that uses those parts. When the supply of parts at a given workstation is about to be exhausted, that station orders the upstream station to replenish the supply. When this procedure is used throughout the plant, it has the effect of pulling parts through the production system. In a push system, parts at each workstation are produced irrespective of the immediate need for those parts at their respective downstream station. In effect, this production discipline pushes parts through the plant. 26.9
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63885-Ch26 - JIT & Lean-3e-S 11-06/06, 06/05/07 Chapter...

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