Lecture 5[1].Chap 4

Lecture 5[1].Chap 4 - Final Refractory Period Clarification...

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Final Refractory Period Clarification
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Absolute Refractory Period Lasts about .5 ms  - No stimulus  will produce another neuronal  response
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Relative Refractory Period Also .5 ms - Only a stimulus of much  greater intensity will produce another  firing of the neuron
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Negative Afterpotential 5 – 15 ms Excitability of neuron is  “supernormal”  Stimulus of lower intensity is  effective
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Positive Afterpotential 5- - 80 ms Neuron is in a “subnormal” phase  so only a stronger than normal  stimulus can excite it
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Physiological Psychology 5
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Chapter 4 Anatomy of the Nervous System
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Structure of the Vertebrate Nervous  System Terms used to describe location when  referring to the nervous system include: Ventral : toward the stomach Dorsal : toward the back Anterior : toward the front end Posterior : toward the back end Lateral : toward the side Medial : toward the midline
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Even if you knew where a section was made there would  still be ambiguity. Conventions adopted to eliminate  ambiguity are: 1. Coronal Plane – usually viewed from behind so structure  on the right side of the brain are on the right side of the  image 2. Sagittal Plane – Usually viewed so the anterior of the   brain is on the left 3. Horizontal Plane – Viewed from above so the anterior  end of the brain is on the left or on top
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“Quick and dirty” rules 1. The higher the structure in the system the more complex  the behavior controlled 2. Left side of the brain controls the right side of the body  and vice versa - but spinal cord and spinal nerves are  controlled by same side” principle – Also major amounts of  information are distributed equally to both sides of the NS 3. Dorsal half of the NS is predominantly sensory; ventral  half is motor. Applies from the cortex through the brain  stem to the spinal cord with the cerebellum being a highly  visible exception
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Structure of the Vertebrate  Nervous System The Nervous System is comprised of two  major subsystems: 1. The Central Nervous System (CNS) 2. The Peripheral Nervous System (PNS)
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Nervous System The  spinal cord  is the part of the CNS  found within the spinal column and  communicates with the sense organs and  muscles below the level of the head. The  Bell-Magendie law  states the entering  dorsal roots carry sensory information and  the exiting ventral roots carry motor  information. The cell bodies of the sensory neurons are 
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This note was uploaded on 09/17/2009 for the course PSCH 262 taught by Professor Greenberg during the Spring '09 term at Ill. Chicago.

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Lecture 5[1].Chap 4 - Final Refractory Period Clarification...

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