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16 Exam Documentation CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE Understand the Sun Certified Java Developer Exam Documentation Requirements
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CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE Understand the Sun Certified Java Developer Exam Documentation Requirements We know that you all know the benefits of thorough, accurate, and understandable documentation. There may be some of you out there who wish that documentation wasn’t an integral part of a programmer’s job. There may be others of you who are thrilled to write documentation, to exercise a different part of your brain, to help your fellow programmers, to capture (hey you, in the back, stop laughing!) your company’s technical assets. Well, whatever your inclination, you’re going to have to write good, solid documentation to support your project if you want to have any chance of passing this exam. It turns out that proper documentation plays as big a role in determining your exam score as many of the software aspects themselves. The assessors will be expecting several pieces of documentation when you submit your exam. They are discussed briefly in the exam packet you receive from Sun; we will go into them more thoroughly in this chapter. The five areas of project documentation that we will cover are Developer’s Documentation End User Documentation javadoc The Developer Choices File Comments and the Version File Developer’s Documentation This area of the project’s documentation is the most open ended. Your assessor is most interested in the final results of your project; these optional documents represent the design work that you did as you were working on the project. Documentation that you might consider providing in this section includes UML diagrams, schema documentation, algorithm documentation, flow diagrams, prototype plans, and test results. Given that the rest of the standalone documentation is to be submitted via ASCII text files or HTML, we recommend the same here. 2 Chapter 16: Exam Documentation
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End User Documentation Your assessor is going to wear at least two hats when reviewing your project. (This makes her appear taller than she really is.) Initially, she will review your project from the standpoint of an end user. Once the end user review is complete, she will put on her ‘techie’ hat and dive into your code and technical documentation. But (and this is a big but), if she can’t get through the end user portion easily and with no problems, she probably has no choice but to fail the project. It won’t matter how unbelievably fabulous your code is, she’ll never see it if the end user experience is challenging. The actual end user documentation should be pretty easy; all it has to do is describe how to install, launch, and run your project. You will probably be told exactly how the application must be installed and launched, and from the end user’s perspective, those tasks will have to be incredibly easy and relatively option free, so there won’t be much to document. The key will be to document how to use the
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ch16 - 16 Exam Documentation CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE...

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