{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lab1 - Name SID Lab 1 Geology of the Berkeley Hills...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Name: SID: Lab 1: Geology of the Berkeley Hills Introduction: Welcome to EPS 50! As a general introduction to the course, this lab will expose you to many of the ways in which geologists observe and interpret rocks in their natural field environment. Through careful observation and recording of information pertaining to various rock types, structures, and their locations, geologic evolution can be investigated. This process is the foundation of geological fieldwork and allows geologists to interpret the evolution of a specific region through time. Objective: In this lab you will examine and characterize three distinct rock types found in the Berkeley Hills: the Claremont formation, the Moraga formation (including the "Grizzly Peak Basalt") and the Orinda formation. You will also learn to read and orient yourself on a topographic map. This information will allow you to investigate geologic processes that have acted on this region in the past and that influence the East Bay today. Answers: Asterisks (*) note where answers are necessary for this lab. All answers should be your own, but we encourage you to discuss and check your answers with 2-3 other students. Discussion and explanation are terrific ways to learn! Labs are graded out of 100 points, and then scaled accordingly. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Part 1: Maps Attached is a topographic map of the Berkeley Hills. Most importantly, topographic maps display contour lines. Contour lines are lines of equal elevation; if you were to walk along a contour line on this map, you would stay at exactly the same elevation, like walking around the base of a mountain. Each contour line on your map represents a change in elevation of 20 feet (~6 meters). To read this map it is first necessary to orient the map to North. Topographic maps display features such as roads and buildings, which can help you orient yourself. * Using color, trace out the roads on your map. This will make navigation easier during our trip. (2 pts). Another important feature of a topographic map is scale. This is a 1 to 8,724, or 1:8724 scale map, so one inch on this map is equal to 8724 inches on earth, or 727 feet. Older US maps are generally not based on the metric system, but science is, so try your measurements in metric units (centimeters and meters, for example). Take a few moments to figure out about how high a meter is in case, for example, you need to estimate an outcrop thickness! * Estimate the distance between the three stops shown on your map (as the crow flies) in metric meters . Show your work . (6 pts).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
You will probably notice that none of the stratigraphic layers we see today are horizontal.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 8

Lab1 - Name SID Lab 1 Geology of the Berkeley Hills...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon bookmark
Ask a homework question - tutors are online