Lab4 - 1 Name: SID: Lab 4: Strawberry Creek Tour and...

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1 Name: SID: Lab 4: Strawberry Creek Tour and Fluvial Processes Introduction: First, we will take a walking tour of Strawberry Creek, starting near the Women’s Faculty Club and ending at the culvert beneath Oxford Street. The path of the creek as well as the morphology of the watershed have, like many other streams and rivers around the United States, been dramatically altered over the years. You will be examining the present character of Strawberry Creek as well as considering what the creek was like before human intervention. Following this, we will consider which factors exert control over the shape and nature of streams and rivers. Objective: During the tour you will be asked to make a number of observations regarding the form and condition of the creek. In addition, as a group we will collect data and make simple calculations. Based on these observations and calculations you will be asked to make some general observations and conclusions about the entire Strawberry Creek watershed on the Berkeley campus. By considering other streams, you will be able to expand this knowledge to say something about different factors that affect the morphology of streams and the landscape around us. Answers: Please answer the indented, numbered questions below on THIS LAB – you will turn in this document . Explanations should be concise; most questions can be answered with a few words, or a sentence or two. All answers should be your own, but we encourage you to discuss and check your answers with 2-3 other students. Discussion and explanation are terrific ways to learn! Labs are graded out of 100 points, and then scaled accordingly. Part 1: Walking the Strawberry Creek watershed In 1860, the ‘College of California’ moved from Oakland to the present site of the Berkeley campus. As we discussed in the previous lab, one of the main reasons the founders chose the location was the presence of Strawberry Creek, which was counted on as a constant water supply for irrigation and other purposes. At that time, three forks of the creek meandered through campus, which was a sloping grassy plain dotted with coast live oaks. The creek and watershed have undergone substantial urbanization since that time. The middle fork, which drained the Central Glade area, was filled in around 1877 to create a dry level area for a cinder running track now occupied by the Life Sciences Building Addition. Substantial portions of the channel now run through underground culverts, and much of the watershed has been built up and paved over. Figure 1 is a map showing the location of each stop. At each stop, refer to the map to reinforce your comprehension of where each stop lies in the drainage network.
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3 Figure 1: Stops on the tour. Stop 1: Women’s Faculty Club, emergence off the Little Inch bypass culvert
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This note was uploaded on 09/17/2009 for the course EPS 50 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Lab4 - 1 Name: SID: Lab 4: Strawberry Creek Tour and...

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