CTCS_Performance

CTCS_Performance - Performance Introduction Notes: 9/20/09...

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Performance 9/20/09 3:30 PM Introduction Notes: Film comes from the human face You and I act and perform in everyday life. We are all performers. There is a uniform code for acting, but we have little grammar to convey it. Rarely does a book on film aesthetics do justice to the acting. ¾ elements of the script is expressed by the actor Dialogue /Character Intonation- the rise and fall of the words during the speaking of words. “What are you doing?” many different intonations that may be applied to any single line of dialogue that create meaning. Actors control the words and therefore the meaning of words. Silence: Not negative in a film. Posture/gesture: Emphasizes actor’s emotions when delivering his lines. rubbing one’s nose or frowning is the gesture. Action : is “the dance” Action vs. Gesture: A gesture can be an adornment/grace note to the action. Action moves the plot along while gestures do not. Business: When an actor has a lot of lines to deliver the actor does little nothings/business in order to fill up screen space. Dialogue vs. Business: Dialogue fill up screen time while gestures fill up space. Gestures add attitude to the delivered lines Mythology: Properties of the character (the fact that Paul Newman is Paul Newman) already tells us about the character and many of the meanings in the film.
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The properties of a play: Player’s physicality -face -voice -body -texture -looks EX.1: Paul Newman Face: old/saggy Voice: fast, clippy, and sandy Body: He ONCE had… Close gray cropped hair Lean toned body Grinning face (pretends that he knows more than you do) curling lips He NOW has… o The look of someone who is “over,” a failure. All of this comes through with his age. “You need an expressive voice on the stage but you don’t need one in film, what you do need on the stage is expressive face, body, and eyes. By expressive I mean something that can be picked up by the camera and so mesmerizing to an audience so as to bring them in by the audience. Something that the camera hooks onto and the audience cannot take their eyes off of” -Drew Casper Commentary on Actors in Films: Movies are images, characters must convey their body, eyes, and movements to the camera. Much of the running time of a movie is
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given to the close up which is an abstraction to the audience to fall into and these are BIG moments. This shows how important face and eyes are. Norma Desmond knew this in Sunset boulevard.
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CTCS_Performance - Performance Introduction Notes: 9/20/09...

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