{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Handout -- Plagiarism

Handout -- Plagiarism - Plagiarism and The Need to Cite...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Plagiarism and The Need to Cite See The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers for thorough plagiarism guidelines. When in doubt about a question of attribution, ask your teacher before handing in your work. Here are the basic points: 1) All language not your own must be properly attributed and placed in quotation marks. Slightly altering another person’s language does not make it your own. Presenting slightly altered language as your own (that is, presenting it without quotation marks) constitutes plagiarism, even if you properly cite your source. 2) All ideas, observations, and interpretations not your own must be properly attributed. It must be clear to the reader what material derives from your sources and what is your own. Another kind of cheating – not strictly plagiaristic, but along the same lines – involves collaborating with friends or family such that your work incorporates ideas and language that are not properly attributed. This is to say that your work must be your own. Consider a single sentence from F.O. Matthiessen’s classic study American Renaissance : “Essential truths of the human imagination are exactly what Hawthorne’s imagination could not shrink from – not even, as we have seen, when he wanted it to.” Examples of plagiarism and problematic attribution: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s thinking tended always toward the profound. Essential truths of the human imagination are exactly what Hawthorne’s imagination could not shrink from – not even when he wanted it to.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern