Lecture 8 TAKEOUT SLIDES

Lecture 8 TAKEOUT - Hm nn-z-c-r um'a'r MIT"-r"|'|=[11.|:|_|rr'|_a|i.m r P.r.~ Lite:|.| Balance Fairness and Bias “Why Aren’t More

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–19. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 12
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 14
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 16
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 18
Background image of page 19
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Hm- ? nn-z-c-r um'a'r MIT? "-'-r--"|-'-.'|= [11 ._.|.-::|_|rr'|._a|i:..m r P-.r:--..~.-:. Lite::|..-.|_:-.,- Balance, Fairness and Bias “Why Aren’t More Women Dying in Chicago?" Main Lessons 50 Far. . . - Find the Journalism Neighborhood -Dietinguish Between News and Opinion __; _ -Fo||owaStoryOverTime is» -Eveiluate the Souroe, Evaluate the Souroe, EvaluatetheSouroe -Always Ask Did the Reporter Open the Freezer? -Reminder: Test #2 atThis Week’s Recitation Lt ITDH'I DIIICIH JHIIIHLITI‘ Balance, Fairness and Bias “Over 6 in 10 US. adults agree that there is bias in the reporting of pews, though there is less agreement as ._ "=" *- \_ . . .3. t9 whetherthere Is a liberal or conservative bias. " ' é)! §:I:'!'.~~|r1teractive Main Em': 1Infill-imma- III} Prcmmciaticn: "ba—len[t}5"- chfimr noun Ehmclcgy.‘ Middle EngJisIL from Paglia-French, ficm 1‘i.-"1.I];:;,:a|r Latin *biiancia, from Late Lech bffflflfi'l mien: having me scalepans, Emu Lash bi— r Esme. iamr plate Date: 13th canary x, ‘\ Balance: Equality between the totals of the -" (or more)sides cf the account. Balance is more technical; a quantitative measurement. Main Envy: 1fair Ilii Pronmoiafiom '-'fer"- Function mfieori‘ve Etymology: hflddle Engiishfager, fair, from Old English finger; akin to Old High German fagar ‘ocamiful I Date: before 12th cottt'urj.r . \\ honesty. Free from self-interest, prejudice, or favoritism. Being fair to the evidence. How to Look for Fairness - Lookforstories that oontainall points of view and perspectives, although theydo not have to be given equalweight. - Lookforstorieswheresubjects are given the opportunityto reply to negative charges and theirstatements are given some prominence. / stereotypical images. \opkforstories that are not emotionallytilted by “loaded” or ' Lookforstorieswith oontextand transparency. ' Lookfor proportional news presentation. Key Definitions Main Em»: ‘hi-as In} Prcnlmciatimt "ltd-95'- thctinrr noun Etymology: Middle French brats 1530 / .,5...; A Predisposition that distorts your .Ir'w ability to fairly weigh the evidence and prevent you from reaching a fair or accurate judgment. I 'I" " 'I1 I" I' 'r'1t'-|-"'-"L-" How to Spot Bias - Look for a consistentpattern of unfairness in reporting or presentation - Compare news reports from a variety ofsouroes especiallyto search for a bias by omission / a. - Avoid usinginferenceto prove bias. Lookfor evidence. ' The search for bias in the news media involvesasearch foryour own bias. How to Assess Bias - Remember: Any assessment of bias must apply to a single news ouflet or story, not the “news media". \3. Bfimember: Any assessment of a new; If" outlet's bias involves its news coverage, "' not its opinion journa|i5m_ nun-a I. Bias Rears Its Ugly Head I . - Race and Gender - Social Issues The Power of Words . “Right-to-Life” vs. “Anti-Abortion” . “Pro-Choice" vs. “Pro-Abortion” "\I - “Ruthless” vs. "Tough" ' “Admitted” VS. “Said” - “Freedom Fighter” vs. “Terrorist” Cognitive Dissonance - People distort incoming information that contradictstheir point of View. ffeople tend to pursue information that reflects their point of View. his is called “confirmation bias. ") - People disassociate messages from sources (the “sleeper effect"). ITDII'I II It JHI'iIIIIIITi' Cognitive Dissona nce, ..... . -When they do remember sources, people selectively describe messages as comingfrom sources who "are known to be more reliable. . g .. x . - People experience a strong pressure to conform to popular opinion. :I""'l"'-|'l: I"I1 It'lllrr'l ili' I1l 'F P'- r'-I.-".-L. Li'i"l I"' " -- I I -r..-_...- .n--:! '.'-.' .-,- =!'-. m um I I “ ostile Media Effect" ' A belief among partisans that _. -- . . - news repertsare paintingthem 1‘s ' . ._ 7 inthewerstpessiblelight. ":-'.-.-_---‘:_._h.-"_:1.:IL Wax! in Leba nan, 1932 “I aDeepiewhe are deeply involved in one side of an issue eranetherarequickertespetand rememberaspects of a news story that are negative. - The best-informed partisars are the mast likelyte see bias. qt- ITDH'I IIIICII JlliIHll Warnings forthe News Consumer - Recognize Your Possible Bias -Test Your AssumptionsAgainstthe Evidence and a Set of Criteria \Go Outside Your Comfort Zone Lesson #6: -Stay0pen to Information That Challenges Your Previously-Held Beliefs and Assumptions Journalism Is a Process Journalism is abouta process in which the facts are weighed on professionalstandards, notwhim {"tneYactors we discussed in what makes news, news drivers, a sense of audience, and a __ combination of importance and interest. _;§\Qéersonal feelings. The standards include many _\ , sr-g-n'f Ian-nan; Uhl-fltflngr Lesson #6 forthe News Consumer - Stay Open to Information That ghallenges Your Previously-Held E. ‘_ éeliefs and Assumptions 1“. arm-'1' amok: LII- HIt I 5'” Ei:.:h-:;--:.I| -:.Ii _|!.:-url'|..1 i:-..rI' 'I i'-JI."-.-'-.-:-.. Li'.i.'r.:1-::-,' Warningsforthe News Consumer - Recognize Your Possible Bias - Test YourAssumptionsAgainst the Evidence and a Set of Criteria "gChallengeYourseifflo Outside "t ' YourComfort Zone - Don’t Rely on Emotions: Use AnalyticalTools to Determine Bias arm-'1' awn-3H: ULIUII'ITI ls Journalistic Objectivity Possible? Objectivity is about the process, not about the person. It is a journalistic system of checks)" and balances. ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 09/21/2009 for the course JRN 103 taught by Professor Schneider during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

Page1 / 19

Lecture 8 TAKEOUT - Hm nn-z-c-r um'a'r MIT"-r"|'|=[11.|:|_|rr'|_a|i.m r P.r.~ Lite:|.| Balance Fairness and Bias “Why Aren’t More

This preview shows document pages 1 - 19. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online