PATRIOT_MISSLE_DEBACLE_(97-03) (1)

PATRIOT_MISSLE_DEBACLE_(97-03) (1) - Patriot Missile...

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Patriot Missile Debacle
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Background On February 25, 1991, during the first Gulf War nick-named Desert Storm, an Iraqi Scud missile hit a U.S. Army barracks in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, killing 28 Americans and injuring 97 people in the strike. The barracks were on an airbase was protected a Patriot missile defense system, but that system failed to accurately track and intercept the incoming Scud missile. The Phased Array Tracking Radar to Intercept of Target (P.A.T.R.I.O.T.) was a surface to air missile battery system deployed at different times to intercept aircraft, cruise missiles and tactical ballistic missiles. At the time, the Patriot missile system was considered to be the most advanced surface-to-air defense systems available and was designed, developed and manufactured by the Raytheon Company, a Massachusetts- based defense contractor. The sale to the U.S. military brought in over $2 billion dollars in revenue for the company. The Patriot was originally designed during the Vietnam War days of the early 1970’s to be used for anti-aircraft defenses. It was then modified and upgraded during the time of the Cold War during the 1980s to be used against Soviet aircraft and short-range ballistic missiles. The target aircrafts were expected to move at less than MACH 2 (1500 mph.), or less than twice the speed of sound, but the system was never used for its intended purpose. Instead, the system was first deployed in 1991 during Operations Desert Storm when the Patriot system was used by U.S. and Israeli armed forces to detect, track, and destroy incoming Iraqi SCUD missiles. The PATRIOT Missile System Patriot systems are typically set up in battalions, which are composed of six missile batteries. Each battery has an Engagement Control Station (ECS) which controls missile interception, a phased-array radar system (MPQ- Figure 1: Patriot Missile Launch System being prepared for launch. Figure 2: Patriot Missile being launched from mobile transport system.
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53) which identifies and tracks targets, 8 missile launchers (ML) that hold 4 missiles each, a Communications Relay Group (CRG) in charge of managing communications, and an Information Coordination Center (ICC) which controls and coordinates with other batteries and battalions. It has a range of approximately 43 miles and the launchers can be taken up to a kilometer away from the radar and control hub because it is linked by microwave signals. Figure 3: The AN//MPQ-53 phased array radar is mounted on a trailer and is unattended in operation. Like the AN/SPY phased-array radar used on Ticongaroga-class warships like the U.S.S. Vincennes, the AN/MPQ-53 is multi-purpose. It unifies its technology into one unit that has
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the ability to search, target detection, target track, identification, missile tracking, missile guidance, and electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) functions. The AN/MPQ-53 is called a “detection to kill” system; it includes in a single unit search, identification, engagement capabilities and functions. More traditional systems require several different radars to perform the set of tasks. The AN/MPQ-53 plays a variety of roles, including
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2009 for the course PHIL 315 taught by Professor Lippincott during the Spring '08 term at Drexel.

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PATRIOT_MISSLE_DEBACLE_(97-03) (1) - Patriot Missile...

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