We the People—Chapter 2

We the People—Chapter 2 - We the...

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We the People—Chapter 2 21:46 The First Founding: Interests and Conflicts Beginning in 1760s--debts and other financial problems in UK forced it to  search for new revenue sources o British government blames it on US o Stamp act— 1760s o Sugar act —1764 Had very limited ways in which to collect revenue “Boston Massacre” Most merchants anxious to end the unrest they had helped to arouse— supported British governments efforts to restore order—most Bostonians  supported British government’s actions in the Boston Massacre o John Adams about the colonists—“a motley rabble of saucy boys” o Lead by Samuel Adams—asserted British power supported an unjust  political/social structure Radicalizing of the Colonists British government granted the politically powerful East India Company a  monopoly on tea exports o Eliminates lucrative trade for colonists o Leads to Boston Tea Party 1773—lead by Samuel Adams Meant to goad British government into putting ridiculous acts into place Set into motion a cycle of provocation that lead to the 1774 convening  of the 1 st  Continental Congress Called for total boycott of British goods Began to consider possibility of independence
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The Declaration of Independence Written by Jefferson Remarkable— o “unalienable rights”—life, liberty, pursuit of happiness that could not be  abridged by government o attempt to identify and articulate a history and a set of principles that might  help to forge a national unity Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union America’s first written Constitution; served as the basis for America’s national  government until 1789 Weak—did give lots of power to the central government o Given no president or presiding officer o Each state, regardless of size had one vote o Members were no more than delegates from state legislatures o Subject to immediate recall by state authorities Powers o Declare war, make peace o Make treaties and alliances o Coin or borrow money o Regulate trade with the Native Americans o Appoint senior officers of the US Army—national government had no army  for those officers to command o Could  not  prevent one state from discriminating against other states in  competition for foreign commerce
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Very impractical The Second Founding: From Compromise to Constitution
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2009 for the course GOVT 1111 taught by Professor Lowi, t during the Fall '07 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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We the People—Chapter 2 - We the...

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