Lecture1_Overview_Case_Studies

Lecture1_Overview_Case_Studies - 1 ECOL / BIOL 4150D/6150D...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 ECOL / BIOL 4150D/6150D Population Biology of Infectious Diseases Spring 2009 Prof. Sonia Altizer, Odum School of Ecology The “ BIG ” picture: Ecology of infectious diseases Three case studies of infectious disease ecology Why study disease ecology? • Most organisms are parasitic in nature Why study disease ecology? • Host-parasite interactions span great scales – Organizational • From molecules to individuals or communities – Temporal • From short term interactions to coevolutionary patterns – Spatial • Within-host dynamics to landscapes or continents Why study disease ecology? • Rapidly developing field ions 15000 20000 biosis pubmed wos zoorecord primatelit Publication year 75-79 80-84 85-89 90-94 95-99 00-04 Number of citati 5000 10000 primatelit Nunn and Altizer, 2005 Why study disease ecology? • Important consequences for human health, wildlife health, biodiversity and conservation 2 The history of disease ecology • Pasteur (1800s) role of microbes in causing disease, Snow (1850), traced origins of London cholera outbreak to Broad Street Pump • Parasitology, virology, nematology (etc.) • Epidemiology: risk factors affecting health • Anderson and May (1978) – introduced the quantitative discipline at a population level (following Barlett, Macdonald, and Ross) – Predictions for AIDS epidemic, vaccination strategies • Conservation biology and wildlife disease (interests have increased in last 10 years) 1) Avian malaria in endemic Hawaiian birds 2 Measles in h man The “BIG” picture: Three case studies of disease ecology 2) Measles in humans 3) Bison brucellosis in Yellowstone The “BIG” picture: Three case studies of disease ecology 1) Avian malaria in endemic Hawaiian birds 2 Measles in h man 2) Measles in humans 3) Bison brucellosis in Yellowston The “BIG” picture: Three case studies of disease ecology 1) Avian malaria in endemic Hawaiian birds 2 Measles in h man 2) Measles in humans 3) Bison brucellosis in Yellowstone Avian malaria in endemic Hawaiian birds Extinction and population declines • Hawaii is home to biological endemism and an adaptive radiation of honeycreepers (40 species) Avian malaria in endemic Hawaiian birds Extinction and population declines • Hawaii is home to biological endemism and an adaptive radiation of honeycreepers (40 species) • Subject of significant extinctions in post human contact with islands human contact with islands • 50% extinct, and 50% of remaining species are threatened/endangered (Jacobi et al. 1995) 3 Avian malaria in endemic Hawaiian birds Extinction and population declines • Hawaii is home to biological endemism...
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2009 for the course ECOL 4150 taught by Professor Prin during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Lecture1_Overview_Case_Studies - 1 ECOL / BIOL 4150D/6150D...

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