Laddering Assignment

Laddering Assignment - Professor Brian Wansink Laddering...

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Unformatted text preview: Professor Brian Wansink Laddering Interview for a Product Champion We all know people who are the ideal customers or champions for a particular brand. In some cases, they may be heavy users (a 6-pack of Coke each day). In other cases, they may have high product knowledge and be the type who enthusiastically talks about the product when given the chance. Marketers are beginning to realize that understanding the relationship these consumers have with the brand can 1. Point out key points of distinction that may be overlooked by both the management and potential customers. 2. Provide insights as to how the company can go about winning more of these “ideal” customers. The best way to understand how consumers relate to products is through laddering interviews. These are described in the article “Laddering Theory, Method, Analysis, and Interpretation.” These interviews are based on the notion that people generally think in terms of product attributes (carbonation, taste, price, etc.) but that these attributes are related to higher level benefits they are seeking. Although these relationships may not be immediately obvious to the consumer, they can be elicited by essentially asking a series of “why” questions. Pages 11-19 give the basic rationale and method. Assignment: Choose a consumer packaged good or service (not a computer, car, or clothes) for which you know someone is a strong champion. You should pick a champion for either a relatively inexpensive item (under $10 or so), or a champion for a service or nonprofit organization (such as a person who is a champion for blood donorship, elementary school tutoring etc.). Using the laddering procedure outlined in the article, interview him or her and determine how he or she developed such a strong commitment to the product, and what caused them to go from “brand loyal” consumer to a “champion.” Getting answers to these will require probing. Their first responses will be superficial. You will turn in 1. A Ladder for your champion (i.e., Hierarchical Value Map, p. 11), and 2. Your suggestions of what marketing insights this interview gives you about customer segments you want to target and specific recommendations you would make for the marketing mix. If this is well thought-out and written in a condensed manner, it should be two pages (single-spaced) or less. You may hand draw your ladder. ...
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