Kant - Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) Duty is the Foundation of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) Duty is the Foundation of Morality
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hume and Kant An Epistemological Question How do we attain knowledge of the world? Empiricism Knowledge is: A-Posteriori First we experience (through the senses) the world and then we know the world. Rationalism Knowledge is: A-Priori We are born with some categories of thought: Space,Time Causality Quantity Quality Relation
Background image of page 2
An Epistemological Question: Hume’s Ethics Empiricism: a-posteriori – David Hume Moral judgments are subjective, vary from person to person, because we can never perceive moral rightness or wrongness in the world. Human rightness and wrongness did not exist independently of the self. Morality is tied to our likes and dislikes, the things we approve or disapprove. Ethics has to do with human being’s practical needs as social human beings and our relations with one another. Morality is subjective and tied to feelings or sentiment. We are naturally incline to do things that are pleasurable, or socially useful.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Rationalism: a-priori - Kant’s Ethics Kant strongly objected the strength and rigor of Hume’s arguments. Morality is Objective not Subjective Kant wants to propose a Pure Moral Philosophy. Cleared from everything empirical. A morality from the idea of DUTY and Moral Laws. A morality of absolute necessity. A morality independent of all human. feelings, because otherwise it will not be absolute and binding upon every person.
Background image of page 4
Kant’s Ethics “What is the purpose of morality? The purpose of morality is to affect our behavior. Kant argues that it is reason, not feelings, sentiment, utility, or preferences, that makes human beings moral beings. Agreeing with Plato, Kant argues that the principles of morality are objective like mathematics, that both are rationally demonstrable. Morality is a property of our minds- based on pure reason- as a rational being. Kant wants to know about the a priori foundations of morality.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Metaphysics of Morals Concept of the Will- and Duty Concept of Reason Concept of the Good Will Concept of Human Action
Background image of page 6
Concept of the Will Is anything good in itself, without any qualification? Yes, but it is not happiness. The only thing that is good without
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 26

Kant - Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) Duty is the Foundation of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online