Irigaray+1 - Lucy Irigaray How to Manage the Transition...

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Lucy Irigaray How to Manage the Transition from Natural to Civil Coexistence? A Two Subject Culture
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How to Manage the Transition from Natural to Civil Coexistence? The source and nature of the self’s identity rests on both the community and the individual. According to Irigaray, in order to inquire into the nature and source of one’s identity is to return to the modern moment where identity, the ‘essential self,’ is defined under the assumptions given by the Cartesian notion of ‘self.’
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“…a return to the self not in the sense of identity as national, ethnic, cultural, etc. but in terms of human identity.”(49) A transition from human nature to human condition Coexistence
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From Descartes, Meditation IV* (Meditations on First Philosophy) “Therefore, just because I know certainly that I exist, and that meanwhile I do not remark that any other thing necessarily pertains to my nature or essence, excepting that I am a thinking thing, I rightly conclude that my essence consists solely in the fact that I am a thinking thing [or a substance whose whole essence or nature is to think].
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From Descartes, Meditation IV* (Meditations on First Philosophy) And although possibly (or rather certainly, as I shall say in a moment) I possess a body with which I am very intimately conjoined, yet because, on the one side, I have a clear and distinct idea of my self inasmuch as I am only a thinking and unextended thing, and as, on the other, I posses a distinct idea of body, inasmuch as it is only an extended and unthinking thing, it is certain that this I [ that is to say, my soul by which I am what I am], is entirely and absolutely distinct from my body , and can exist without it.”
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This notion of the self for Irigaray is one of the sources of gender stereotypes: The Cartesian notion ‘self’ accepts and justifies a mind-body distinction. Our society has come to accept the ‘masculinity’ of the mind and the femininity of the body. Irigaray claims that the philosophical notion of the self as consciousness or mind incorporates sexism right into our notions of human nature.
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Ultimately, Irigaray claims that the essential self is a limiting and oppressive notion, particularly when applied to women. The female sex is not singular and unified; women are not unified together; the female is not a sex at all. According to Irigaray, women has multiple selves instead of a single body and a single soul. All human beings, men included, may have multiples
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2009 for the course HUM 282927 taught by Professor Edwards during the Fall '08 term at Florida State College.

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Irigaray+1 - Lucy Irigaray How to Manage the Transition...

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