PSYC 324.docx - PSYC 324 Developmental Psychopathology T 8\/27 Class Content Basic Theory and Research in Developmental Psychopathology Application

PSYC 324.docx - PSYC 324 Developmental Psychopathology T...

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PSYC 324: Developmental Psychopathology T 8/27 Class Content Basic Theory and Research in Developmental Psychopathology Application: Assessment and Intervention TR 8/29 Significance of the Field Most psychiatric disorders first appear in childhood or adolescence Prevalence of mental health problems in children and adolescents is increasing Scarcity of services to meet needs History o Early societal perspectives Children were not thought as individuals that required needs, more as of miniature adults o Philosophical influences John Locke – one of the first to consider children systematically o Medical influences Psychiatry – disorders linked as medical conditions rather than witchery o Growth of psychological perspectives Psychoanalytic Theory (Freud) – mainly focused on adults but included child development as a factor Behaviorism (Skinner, Watson) Late 1800s-mid 1900s Emergence of the Field o Convergence of adult clinical psychology, adult and child psychiatry, developmental psychology (1970s-80s) Separating the conditions of the adult and child o Links to developmental psychology (role of experiences) o Links to psychiatry (focus on atypical development) o Differentiation from developmental psychology Focus on similarities vs. individual differences Focus on normative vs. atypical development o Differentiation from psychiatry Focus on diagnosable disorder vs. risk Concern about social context Current Perspectives o Developmental Competence Ability to use internal and external resources to achieve successful adaptation to the environment
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o Adaptational Failure Deviation from normative behavior (e.g., autism) Deviation from age-appropriate norms (e.g., impulsivity) Exaggeration of normal developmental problems (e.g., extreme aggression) Interference in normal developmental progress (e.g., poor peer relations) Delay in mastery of age-appropriate tasks (e.g., language delay) o Developmental Tasks 0-2 Infancy: attachment 2-5 Preschool: autonomy, self-control 5-11 Middle childhood: school, peer relations 11-18 Adolescence: self-identity, close friendships, dating Psychopathology as failure to achieve normative developmental tasks Key Themes Developmental Pathways o Equifinality : how might different early experiences lead to the same outcome? Socioeconomic status Bullying Problems at home Trauma Genetics/genetic predisposition (e.g., Schizophrenia) o Multifinality : how might the same early experience lead to different outcomes? Aggression/depression models Resilience/personality Perception of experience Reciprocal Influences o How does development influence the course of psychopathology? (e.g., emotional dysregulation and depression) o How does psychopathology influence the course of development?
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  • Spring '13
  • Rudolph
  • Social anxiety disorder, Major depressive disorder, The Unconscious

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