Lecture7__8211_Chapter2

Lecture7__8211_Chapter2 - Lecture 7 Chapter 2 Monday,...

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Lecture 7 – Chapter 2 Monday, September 15 th
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Counting Techniques ± Last lecture we have seen that if a set A contains N(A) simple events, and the total number of possible simple events is N then: ± It is easy to count this if number N is small. If N is large we have to use a technique to count all possible outcomes () ( ) NA PA N =
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Product rule of ordered pairs ± An ordered pair is a pair of objects A and B of the same type, where (A,B) is different from (B,A). ± If the first element of an ordered pair can be selected in n 1 ways and for each way the second element can be selected in n 2 ways then the number of pairs is n 1 n 2 .
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Example ± I want to buy a new desktop computer. There are 4 different brands that I can buy the case from and 3 different brands that I can buy the monitor from. ± How many different ways of buying my desktop exist?
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Tree Diagram ± Tree Diagram is a configuration that can be used to pictorially all the possibilities ± Example: ² I want to buy a new desktop computer. There
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2009 for the course STAT 318 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Penn State.

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Lecture7__8211_Chapter2 - Lecture 7 Chapter 2 Monday,...

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