Lecture 11_26 - Political Participation Brief history...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Political Participation Brief history Contemporary voter turnout Who votes? Why is voter turnout low? Beyond voter turnout Announcement Republican Debate Party sponsored by Pi Sigma Alpha and the CLA Honors Office Everyone is welcome Wednesday, November 28th 8-10 p.m. BRNG 1245 Voter Turnout As the right to vote has expanded, the proportion of eligible citizens actually voting has decreased. Nineteenth Century Activism Vote turnout high (But note: limited franchise) Parties strong Progressive Reforms, I Efforts to eliminate corruption in the late Nineteenth Century Efforts to eliminate the influence of the lower classes Progressive Reforms, II Reforms: Primary elections; Voter registration laws; Secret ballots, nonpartisan ballots; Denial of voting rights for aliens; Merit system for public jobs Recent Turnout, I Between 1964 and 2000 turnout in presidential elections has declined from 62% to 52%; Bounce in 2004: 58%; Turnout in 2008? Recent Turnout, II Turnout in off-year congressional elections falls further (below 45%); Young people: lower still in off-years Primary elections bring out even fewer voters. Who Votes? Social Class matters: higher income and education more likely to participate; Age matters: older more likely to participate Mobility of young adults Why Turnout is Low, I Satisfaction among Nonvoters; Voters are "turned off" by political campaigns; Lack of Social Rootedness; Barriers to registration; Why Turnout is Low, II Failure of parties to mobilize voters; Lack of strong labor unions; Partisan efforts to discourage voters; Rational calculations of costs and benefits Beyond Voter Turnout Besides voting, how else might you participate in politics? Interest Groups Definition Why and Which People Join Direct and Indirect Lobbying Interest Group Success The Essentials, I Interest Groups organizations made up of groups of people who share a common concern and who work together to influence policymaking IGs not PACs IGs not political parties Proliferation of IGs since '60s Strategies of Interest Groups Interest groups may: Try to get new laws passed; Try to prevent action and lobby Congress not to adopt new laws; Try to influence elections; Try to influence appointments to either the bureaucracy or the courts Why People Join Psychological satisfaction due to identification with a cause; For social benefits; Direct monetary benefits; Coercion Which People Join People with higher incomes and education; E. E. Schattschneider: "The flaw in the pluralist heaven is that the angelic chorus sings with an upper class accent." What would Madison call an interest group? Lobbying Lobbying the efforts of interest groups to influence government: May involve direct contact between a lobbyist and a government official; or May involve indirect action including efforts to change public opinion which then influences officials Tactics of Interest Groups, I Direct lobbying personal encounters with a lobbyist which may include: Making personal contacts; Providing expertise; Testifying at congressional hearings; Donating money to policymakers (through PACs); Lobbying the bureaucracy; Litigating in court Tactics of Interest Groups, II Indirect Lobbying going public by mobilizing activists and molding and activating public opinion: Mobilizing the grass roots; Mobilizing the vote Molding public and elite opinion Protest and civil disobedience Building coalitions The Success of Interest Groups What makes an IG powerful? The size of the group Geographical distribution Money Public image Group cohesion and intensity ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 09/23/2009 for the course POL 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

Page1 / 21

Lecture 11_26 - Political Participation Brief history...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online